Monthly Archives: April 2019

55 posts

Chasing the Moon

“Chasing the Moon,” a film by Robert Stone, reimagines the race to the moon for a new generation, upending much of the conventional mythology surrounding the effort. The series recasts the Space Age as a fascinating stew of scientific innovation, political calculation, media spectacle, visionary impulses and personal drama. Utilizing a visual feast of previously overlooked and lost archival material — much of which has never before been seen by the public — the film features a diverse cast of characters who played key roles in these historic events. Among those included are astronauts Buzz Aldrin, Frank Borman and Bill Anders; Sergei Khrushchev, son of the former Soviet premier and a leading Soviet rocket engineer; Poppy Northcutt, a 25-year old “mathematics whiz” who gained worldwide attention as the first woman to serve in the all-male bastion of NASA’s Mission Control; and Ed Dwight, the Air Force pilot selected by the Kennedy administration to train as America’s first black astronaut.

Airs 4/12 at 10:30 p.m. (repeats 4/21 at 12:30 a.m.)

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Without a Net: The Digital Divide in America

Many of us assume that the world, or at least the country, is now fully connected, but throughout American classrooms, there exists a digital divide. In a shockingly large number of schools, access to technology, connectivity, and teacher-training is nonexistent. Many of those underserved schools are located just a few miles from fully equipped schools with technologically adept teachers in better funded districts. This new film from Academy Award® nominated, Primetime Emmy Award winning Director/Producer Rory Kennedy, in which we see the situation through the eyes of students, educators, and policy experts and advocates across the country, clearly lays out the steps we must take a to bring our public education system into the 21st century.

Airs 4/11 at 4-5 a.m.

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Full Video

Edible Books?

What is your favorite book?

Do you think you could represent the title in an artistic way using food?

Last week, Gastro Obscura came out with an article about Edible Book Festivals where people do just that. Can you think of other ways to represent your favorite book title in an artistic way? Maybe your students can!

Murder in Montrose: The Paul Broussard Legacy

– In 1991, Paul Broussard, a 27 year old gay man, was murdered on the streets of Houston, sparking a deafening outcry. The crime served as a wake-up call that highlighted all of the harassment and mistreatment experienced by the LGBTQ community. Through the documentary, we explore the aftermath of this pivotal event – from civil unrest to hate crime legislation; from victim’s rights to political activism, Houston and the nation would never be the same again.

Airs 4/10 at 4:30-5 a.m.

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From the Wings: The Live Art Story

Erin Thomas Foley woke up from a dream she had one night with a vision that, while seemingly impossible, planted the seed that turned into an innovative idea which would inspire those around her. In the dream, kids with special needs were performing alongside typically developed kids on a large stage for a big audience. Over the years that followed, Erin and those around her would turn that dream into a reality with the creation of LIVE ART. FROM THE WINGS: THE LIVE ART STORY is about a group of children with varying abilities that came come together to create an unprecedented performance and change their community forever. The documentary follows six students from the School of the Performing Arts in the Richmond Community (SPARC) in Virginia, their families and several staff members, and chronicles how the children and adults face their own fears, learn what empathy really means, and discover countless things they didn’t know about themselves and the world around them. The experience culminates in an inspirational night of music, dance and visual art-including a performance by recording artist Jason Mraz-that unifies students with and without disabilities before a sold-out audience at the majestic Carpenter Theatre.

Airs 4/10 at 4:30 p.m.

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2019 Carol A. Kearney Ed. Leadership Institute

Transform Learning with the Reimagined ESIFC

Registration is now open for the NYLA-SSL 2019 Carol A. Kearney Educational Leadership Institute: Transform Learning with the Reimagined ESIFC led by Dr. Barbara Stripling.

This revised ESIFC aligns with the AASL, ISTE, ELA, Social Studies, and NextGen Science Standards. It will provide a comprehensive continuum of information fluency skills PK-12 and clear guidance for school librarians to integrate the teaching of essential information fluency and inquiry skills across all grade levels and throughout the curriculum.

The Institute will take place August 7th and 8th at the Syracuse University Sheraton in Syracuse, NY.

Register now!

Reconstruction: America After the Civil War

Explore the transformative years following the American Civil War, when the nation struggled to rebuild itself in the face of profound loss, massive destruction, and revolutionary social change. The twelve years that composed the post-war Reconstruction era (1865-77) witnessed a seismic shift in the meaning and makeup of our democracy, with millions of former slaves and free black people seeking out their rightful place as equal citizens under the law. Though tragically short-lived, this bold democratic experiment was, in the words of W. E. B. Du Bois, a ‘brief moment in the sun’ for African Americans, when they could advance, and achieve, education, exercise their right to vote, and run for and win public office. The first two hours of the series will center on this pivotal decade following the rebellion, charting black progress and highlighting the accomplishments of the many political leaders who emerged to usher their communities into this new era of freedom.

The series’ second half will look beyond that hopeful decade, when the arc of history bent backwards. It became increasingly clear that many former Confederates were never willingly going to accept this new social order and that the federal government was not prepared to provide African Americans with consistent or enduring protection of their new rights. While tracing the unraveling of Reconstruction and the rise of Jim Crow segregation in the closing years of the nineteenth century, we will look at the myriad ways in which black people continued to acquire land, build institutions, and strengthen communities amidst increasing racial violence and repression. Less than thirty years after black men filled state legislatures, one by one, like dominoes tumbling the Southern states began drastically restricting the vote while drawing a stark color line that divided white and black America. The series will conclude with a focus on both the flowering of African American art, music, literature, and culture as tools of resistance in the struggle against Jim Crow racism and the surge of political activism that marked the launch of such iconic civil rights organizations as the National Association of Colored Women, the Niagara Movement, and the NAACP, all at a time when black political power had been blunted and the dream of an interracial democracy seemed impossibly out of reach.

  • #101 – airs 4/9 at 9 p.m.
  • #102 – airs 4/16 at 9 p.m.

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