Offair Listings

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Hearing Is Believing

HEARING IS BELIEVING, the new non-fiction feature from award-winning filmmaker Lorenzo DeStefano, introduces the world to the astonishing young musician and composer, Rachel Flowers. Born 15 weeks premature, Rachel soon lost her eyesight. At two she began playing every song she heard by ear, including Bach fugues. Starting her musical education at the age of 4, it was soon clear that the child had perfect pitch. DeStefano and his team have created a dynamic and engaging portrait of two years in the life of a tight- knit American family, a single mom and her two kids, living paycheck to paycheck in Oxnard, California, with Rachel’s stunning music as the soundtrack. The film revels in Rachel’s joyous and free-flowing love of song, illuminating the bonds of family and the divine mysteries of creativity.

Airs 1/18 at 9 p.m.

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Food Delicious Science (3/60 minute programs)

Food – Delicious Science is the thrilling science story of the food on your plate and the physics, chemistry and biology that lies hidden inside every bite. Across three episodes we use the latest imaging techniques to reveal this inner world of food and we reveal along the way why such a variety of foods have ended up in our diet and how they affect our lives. When viewed at the microscopic level, food resembles a vast range of alien landscapes that shift in remarkable ways as we cook them. Each time we eat, a cascade of biological reactions is set off inside our bodies: from flavor explosions in the mouth; to an energy rush; to occasionally triggering waves of disgust.  And how these ingrained human reactions and cravings for food have deep evolutionary roots that offer a whole new way of thinking about our relationship to the modern diet. The science is set against sumptuous location photography shot across the world: from the oldest rice terraces in the Philippines to an ancient variety of potato in the Andes Mountains of Peru; from the corn fields of Mexico to the milk dairies of Bulgaria as we seek the origins of some our favorite foods to deepen our understanding of why we eat them. This is food as you’ve never seen it before.

Airs Thursday beginning 1/17 at 2 a.m.

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  • #1 – Food On The Brain – Travel the world with Michael Mosley and James Wong to discover how the chemistry in our food affects our brains and creates our deepest cravings. This is delicious science.
  • #2 – A Matter of Taste – Travel the world with Michael Mosley and James Wong to learn about the science that makes our food taste delicious and the powerful effect it has on our tongue and nose.

#3 – We Are What We Eat – Travel the world with Michael Mosley and James Wong to learn how the hidden chemistry in every mouthful of food keeps our bodies fit and healthy.

Second Opinion (1400) (10/30 minute programs)

Fast-paced and provocative, SECOND OPINION focuses on health literacy in an engaging, entertaining and accessible way. The long-running series engages a panel of medical professionals and lay people in honest, in-depth discussions about complex health issues and life-changing medical decisions. Host Dr. Peter Salgo, who maintains a full-time practice at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, presents intriguing, real-life medical cases to professionals representing a variety of specialties. As the experts grapple with the diagnosis and treatment options, viewers gain an understanding of doctors’ decision-making process. This season, topics include: psoriasis, chronic pain management, medical radiation, pituitary gland tumor, living with Alzheimer’s, pneumonia, autism and more.

Airs Friday beginning 1/11 at 1 a.m.

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  • #1401 – Overdose – Only two months since their son Patrick died of a heroin overdose, Mary and Joe Mullin courageously share their story with viewers. They tell their very personal experience of Patrick’s decline into opioid use, and then heroin addiction and treatment. They talk about Patrick’s ups and downs, and his relapses. The panel of experts discusses the drug epidemic in the U.S., and offer solid, timely information about prevention and treatment. Episode 1 Full Video
  • #1402 – Head & Neck Cancer – As an incredibly fit triathlete, Lou Iovoli was shocked to hear that he had a late-stage cancer that could possibly kill him. As Lou and his own doctor share the story of the drastic measures they took to treat him, they give hope to those diagnosed with this disease that is often disfiguring, devastating, and deadly. Episode 2 Full Video
  • #1403 – Type 1 Diabetes – At nine years old, Liam McCammon was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. Together with his mom Linda Moroney, they share his story of how he lives with the disease and how new technology helps him lead a life as any other 11-year old. Experts discuss how groundbreaking research is making the lives of children with Type I Diabetes, and their parents, better than ever before. Episode 3 Full Video
  • #1404 – Immunotherapy in Cancer Treatment – Despite his initial prognosis of six to eight months to live, Ronald Eckert, MD, is thriving after undergoing a new immunotherapy treatment for stage 4 melanoma. Four years after the treatment, he feels he is cured and shares his story. Medical experts discuss the groundbreaking immunotherapy research and treatments being discovered each day in the area of cancers-treatments that will change the way we look at cancer. Episode 4 Full Video
  • #1405 – Crohn’s Disease – Since the age 12, Gabi Thomas has been fighting the physical and mental ramifications of having Crohn’s Disease. She explains her challenges over the last 15 years, which culminated in several hospital stays and being on the brink of death. While experts discuss current treatments for Crohn’s, Gabi shares her journey of healing; explaining why she has never felt better. Episode 5 Full Video
  • #1406 – Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – Showing signs of depression and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder from a young age, Kyra Mills finally found the help she needed when she was an adult. An often misunderstood disorder, Kyra and the medical experts openly discuss diagnosis and treatment options, while helping to destigmatize the disorder.  Episode 6 Full Video
  • #1407 – Hospital Delirium – While caring for her mother, Donna Smith learned for the first time about Hospital Delirium. The family worked closely with her medical team to get her out of bed, sharing old stories and eventually getting her placed in a rehab center. Hospital Delirium is a grossly misunderstood issue in ICUs in our country, but Donna and the medical experts delve into the topic in a way that will help countless people who are unaware of the issue. Although the story has a sad ending, the information shared will help others face these challenges. Episode 7 Full Video
  • #1408 – Transgender Health – While other media outlets sensationalize and politicize issues surrounding transgender youth, Second Opinion looks at the issue from a truly medical perspective. Along with medical experts who specialize in working with families, Jennifer and Josselynn Surridge tell their story of what it is like to come to terms with being a transgender person and being a mother of a transgender child-a story that will help every American understand the issue in a way that is rarely explored in the popular press. Episode 8 Full Video
  • #1409 – Atrial Fibrillation – Unsure of the cause of his racing heart and extreme fatigue, Joel Dittman was finally diagnosed with the very common disorder, Atrial Fibrillation. As he shares his story, medical experts discuss the treatments that are available to help people with this condition lead full and active lives. Episode 9 Full Video
  • #1410 – Eating Disorders – A lifelong battle for health is at the center of this captivating story on Eating Disorders. Jennifer Slack bravely shares details on her life, how she recognized her condition, and how she continuously works to battle her disease. Experts discuss new treatments for eating disorders, reflecting on how management of Eating Disorders has changed since Jennifer was diagnosed 30 years ago. Episode 10 Full video

Reading Way (15/15 minute programs)

designed to help early readers develop reading proficiency and learn to read for meaning.  A variety of word recognition strategies will be presented, including phonic analysis, configuration clues, sight words and context clues.

Airs Thursday beginning 1/10 at 4 a.m.

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  • #1 – Using “l” Blends
  • #2 – Using “c” and “g”
  • #3 – Using Short “a” and “i”
  • #4 – Consonant Diagraphs
  • #5 – Using Short “o” and “u”
  • #6 – Using Short “e” patterns
  • #7 – Using Silent “e”
  • #8 – Vowel Diagraphs
  • #9 – Sounds of “y”
  • #10 – Using “r” with “a” and “o”
  • #11 – Using “r” with “e” “i” and “u”
  • #12 – Vowel Diphthongs
  • #13 – Variant Vowels “au” “ou” and “aw”
  • #14 – Variant Vowels “ay” and “ow”

#15 – Special Consonant Combinations

Curious Traveler (300) (12/30 minute programs)

Takes viewers on an enriching and entertaining “field trip for grown-ups” to some of the most intriguing European and North American cities in the world. Daytime Emmy- and Telly-winning travel, arts and entertainment journalist Christine Van Blokland brings her passion and genuine curiosity for the arts, quirky characters, storytelling, and lifelong learning to this new series. In each location, Christine explores the hidden histories in their art, architecture, museums, monuments, houses of worship and city parks. Each episode begins with Christine’s list of “Curious Questions”: Is the Mona Lisa really a prostitute? Is the Eiffel Tower really Egyptian? Why are there acorns all through Grand Central Terminal? Christine’s previous television credits include: Let’s Go!, Georgia Traveler, Let’s Go! Georgia and Better Destinations.

Airs Tuesdays beginning 1/8 at 1 a.m.

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  • #301 – Curious Dublin – How did Dublin get its name? And what do Vikings and a black pool have to do with it? Who was Maewyn Succat, and why is he celebrated with green beer? How did the harp become a symbol of Ireland, and why do the harps on Irish coins and Guinness beer look different? What is the curious history of the Book of Kells, and how did it make its way into Trinity College’s Longroom Library?
  • #302 – Curious Vienna – Who were the Habsburgs, Maria Theresa, Franz Joseph and Sisi? And how did they shape Vienna? What is the Ringstrasse, and why are there so many oversized, ornate public buildings dotting it? Where did Mozart perform as a 6-year-old prodigy? When and why did Austria shrink to a tenth of its size? What do the eagles on the rooftop of St. Stephen’s Cathedral symbolize? And why are Vienna’s coffee and pastries so legendary?
  • #303 – Curious Yorkshire – This beautiful region of England is full of picture-perfect rolling hills, quaint stone cottages, sprawling country estates and that distinct Yorkshire dialect. Why are country estates named Castles and Abbeys? What is The Shambles, and how did it get its name? Why is one of the largest medieval Gothic cathedrals in Europe in the small town of York? How did the Quakers and chocolate shape York’s history? Where and what is Herriot’s country?
  • #304 – Curious Saltzburg – Why is there a giant church complex, the DomQuartier, in this tiny Alpine town? And why is there an equally giant medieval fortress high above it? Who lived in Mirabell Palace? And Hellbrun Palace? Why is Getreidegassse so charming, and why are those shop signs so important? And how do you solve a problem like Maria? From the Sound of Music to Silent Night to the Sonatas of this town’s beloved Mozart, it’s time to get curious about Salzburg.
  • #305 – Curious San Miguel de Allende – How did this UNESCO town in Mexico get such a curious name? And what do a duck and a dog have to do with it? Why are there so many grand mansions in such a small town? Why do postcards have to do with its soaring Gothic church? Why is there an art school in a former convent? And how did San Miguel de Allende become a magnet for retired American military on the G.I. Bill?
  • #306 – Curious Edinburgh – Why did the Scottish kings live in Edinburgh, and why don’t we have Scottish kings anymore? Why was Edinburgh Castle built high upon on Castle Rock? What’s the connection between Edinburgh and Harry Potter? And where are the real-life inspirations for Harry Potter locations? What is so royal about Edinburgh’s Royal Mile? Who is Arthur, and why does he get his own Seat?
  • #307 – Curious Guanajuato City – Why is there a stone giant holding a flame, high in the hills overlooking the town? How did silver help shape this Mexican town? Why are its streets and alleys so winding, and what happened to the Guanajuato River? What does the town’s main church have to do with the King of Spain? Why does the town’s marketplace look like a Paris train station? And its theatre looks like the Paris Opera House?
  • #308 – Curious Austrian Christmas Markets – Why is a European Christmas Market also called Weihnachtsmarkt or a Christkindlmarkt? And what do these markets have to do with the Holy Roman Empire? Why do you find Christmas Markets mostly in German-speaking countries? What is the curious history of the Advent Wreath, of Silent Night, and a creepy Christmas character named Krampus? And is a Krampus different than a Krapfen?
  • #309 – Curious London Shops – You may not be able to live like a royal, but wouldn’t it be nice to shop like one? In this episode, we explore the curious world of Royal Warrants, a special designation given to only the best shops and services, literally fit for a king (or queen, or prince or princess). Kind of like knighthood for a shop. From the royal dressmakers to tiara makers to the royal cheese monger (yes, there is such a thing); we take you across London, inside the world of the royals.
  • #310 – Curious Glasgow – Who is buried under Glasgow Cathedral and why? Who is Saint Mungo, and why is he so big? Why does Glasgow City Chambers look like a palace? How did this seaport town become a center for Scottish Enlightenment? And how did the creativity of one man, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, leave a permanent mark on this city?
  • #311 – Curious Williamsburg – Why did the English choose Jamestown, Yorktown and Williamsburg, Virginia as their early American settlements? Why did King William III and Queen Mary II establish a university here? What was life like for the colonists here? What crazy concoctions are to be found in a colonial apothecary?
  • #312 – Curious Quebec City – After nearly 500 years, French is still the official language of this North American city. How has this UNESCO World Heritage Site retained its ‘Frenchness’ after all this time? Why does the Chateau Frontenac hotel look like a French castle, and what does it have to do with the Canadian railway? What’s so curious about Rue Saint-Jean, Place Royal and Petit-Champlain?

Korla

the amazing story of John Roland Redd, an African American from Columbia, Missouri who migrated to Hollywood in 1939 and reinvented himself as a musician from India. As one of early television’s pioneering musical artists, Korla Pandit’s life was one of talent, determination, ingenuity and racial passing, a story not fully realized until after his death in 1998.

Airs 1/16 at 2 a.m.

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Trust Docs (1000) (11/30 minute programs)

TRUST DOCS, which is in partnership with the Thomson Reuters Foundation, takes viewers around the globe to explore under-reported stories about critical social issues through personal stories from individuals. This magazine series utilizes short documentaries to translate headlines into human experiences and covers a range of issues including the effects of war, the fight for refugee rights, struggles to adjust to climate change, housing and land rights, global mental health, changing gender identities and more.

Airs Wednesday beginning January 2 at 3 a.m. and  #1011 on 1/30 at 4 a.m.

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  • #1001 – “Women’s Work” – From Senegal to Sri Lanka, women from all over the world are trailblazing through gender barriers in difficult and often dangerous environments. They are defying cultural norms and finding ways to pursue their dreams and change their future. Many women overcome discrimination giving a new meaning to the term “women’s work.”
  • #1002 – “Colombia’s Ghosts of War” – The 52-year Colombian civil war is not ending without leaving deep scars. As rebels hand over weapons, an entire generation of Colombians is emerging from the conflict to rebuild their nation. While some are struggling more than others, many citizens are rolling up their sleeves to clear out the ghosts of war.
  • #1003 – “Life in Refugee Camps” – More than a political buzzword, refugees are real people with real fears driving their decisions, and they take great risks to protect their families. A glimpse into the lives of immigrants living in refugee camps reveals their hunger for human rights and an opportunity to start over.
  • #1004 – “Searching for Home” – More than a political buzzword, refugees are real people with real fears driving their decisions, and they take great risks to protect their families. A glimpse into the lives of immigrants living in refugee camps reveals their hunger for human rights and an opportunity to start over.
  • #1005 – “Adapting to Climate Change” – Climate change affects us all, and less-developed communities that are more closely tied to the land often suffer more directly from environmental transformation. The changes include dramatic fluctuation of water sources, diminishing crop yields, and failure of long-held farming techniques. Discover how community leaders are adjusting, engaging with the international community and seeking innovative methods and new technologies to find sustainable ways of living.
  • #1006 – “Breaking Stereotypes” – From India to Bosnia, China to Kenya, people are confronting traditional norms around gender and sexuality that are difficult to break. Despite opposition and discrimination from their communities, these people are armed with the courage to truly be themselves. The small steps people take to assert their role in society can result in major leaps for future generations.
  • #1007 – “Storytelling the Globe” – Virtual reality experiences, comic books, and architectural mapping are all forms of storytelling being used by artists and activists around the world to raise awareness of social problems. From calling out sexual assault in India to documenting war crimes in Gaza, these modes of communication are connecting people to issues across the world.
  • #1008 – “the Resilience of Children” – The future of our communities lies in protecting our most vulnerable yet most resilient members: our children. But often, children are the first victims of war and poverty. Many face horrifying events and live with the trauma for the rest of their lives. Despite this, some children survive these events to become leaders of their communities and voices for peace.
  • #1009 – “Between Stigma & Healthcare” – Many communities around the world see disease and mental illness not as something to be treated, but as something to be feared. As a result, many suffering from curable conditions are stigmatized within their communities. But through education and organizing, some people are challenging these stigmas and addressing health issues previously considered taboo.
  • #1010 – “Green at What Price?”– In the name of environmental restoration, the Ugandan government is expanding the country’s forest reserves in order to sell into the global carbon credit market. But this program comes at a high human cost as the state is displacing long established villages, forcing people to relocate, and jailing those opposing the program.

#1011 – “One Man, One City, Three Evictions” – Rio de Janeiro has experienced several waves of development in the past century. For Altair Guimaraes the changes have affected him directly. Brought up in a favela, he has been evicted three times as a result of Rio’s developments. As Brazil tries to gain global recognition and increase tourism, locals like Altair are forced to relocate despite property titles. Now, their struggles are becoming a symbol of a global phenomenon.

 

Sight: The Story of Vision

SIGHT is arguably our most important sense, an extremely complex process, which requires light that can start with photons, generated in distant stars and ending in the visual cortex of our brains. In the middle of this process are our eyes. This hour-long documentary looks at the science, medicine and technology of vision and the individuals who are battling the darkness of blindness.

Airs 1/15 at 8 a.m.

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