Featured Resources

54 posts

Free Speech: Challenge of Our Times

This first paragraph (in quotes) is taken VERBATIM from the WXXI Television Highlights —

“Free speech is a fundamental element to a democracy. In America, it’s sometimes taken for granted. Free Speech: Challenge of Our Times, presented by Arizona State University’s School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership and Arizona PBS, takes a deep look into this constitutional right and how we as Americans can protect it. The programs pull a diverse spectrum of viewpoints from academics, politicians and free speech thought leaders.”

These ten programs are online for your students to watch at any time. While some may seem a little dry, they bring up important points for our students to think about. These programs would be especially valuable to social studies classes, journalism students, and libraries – champions of intellectual freedom!

Program 1 features former US Senators Tom Daschle, D-S.D. and Jon Kyl, R-Arizona, as they discuss disagreement and the role of civil dialogue in American politics and culture. (27m 40s)

Program 2 highlights First Amendment lawyer and author Floyd Abrams, who represented The New York Times in the landmark Pentagon Papers Supreme Court case, where he explains why free speech must be protected.

Program 3 features Jonathan Haidt, author of “The Righteous Mind” and co-founder of Heterodox Academy, explores “America’s Escalating Outrage” and its impact of universities in America.

Program 4– Scholars Robert P. George and Cornel West discuss the importance of open dialogue in pursuit of civil discussion and the serious and respectful exchange of ideas, on university campuses and in American society.

Program 5 features Middlebury Professor Allison Stanger and Reed Professor Lucia Martinez Valdivia as they examine issues that surround free speech on campus when protests turn extreme.

Program 6 is a student panel discussion about ‘Why Do Students Need Free Speech on Campus?’ It is part of the “Free Speech and Intellectual Diversity in Higher Education and American Society” series sponsored by SCETL and co-sponsored by the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and the Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law at ASU.

Program 7 – Bret Weinstein, evolutionary biologist; Heather MacDonald, the Thomas W. Smith fellow at the Manhattan Institute; and Ulrich Baer, professor of German and Comparative Literature at New York University; talk about negotiating controversial speakers on campus.

Program 8 Professor Geoffrey Stone of the University of Chicago, who authored the school’s statement of principles on free expression, discusses the appropriate limits on free speech in institutions of higher learning.

Program 9 Experimental psychologist and Harvard University Professor Steven Pinker explores the fundamental right of free speech.

Program 10 Steven Hayward of Powerline and University of California, Berkeley, presents the intellectual suicide of American universities and the causes and remedies associated with it.

Frontline Films Online

Do you ever happen to see something on FRONTLINE that would work perfectly with your students?

FRONTLINE films are investigative, journalistic documentaries that often air on PBS. These films cover current events, and uncover stories that are often untold. They’ve won 91 Emmy awards and 22 Peabody awards. They have also posted over 200 of their films online for you to watch FOR FREE whenever you want.

Find them at: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/

A few of their listed titles are:

  • Fire in Paradise
  • In the Age of AI
  • Flint’s Deadly Water
  • Documenting Hate: Charlottesville
  • Documenting Hate: New American Nazis
  • The Trouble with Chicken

… And So Much More!!!

Veterans Day

Veterans Day is coming up on Monday. Originally called, Armistice Day, it commemorated the end of the fighting of World War I, when the Allies and Germany put an armistice into effect on the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month”. It was a day to honor veterans of World War I. However, World War II happened, and then the Korean War after that. In 1954, it was renamed Veterans Day to honor American veterans of all wars.

Since World War I was an international conflict, this is a day that our allies also celebrate. Britain, Canada, and Australia all celebrate “Remembrance Day” on or around November 11.

Lange, Katie. “5 Facts to Know About Veterans Day.” U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, 5 Nov. 2018,
www.defense.gov/explore/story/article/1675470/5-facts-to-know-about-veterans-day/.

We have lots of resources for you and your students about Veterans Day.

Videos:

 

Armistice Day and Veteran’s Day

Woodrow Wilson declared November 11th Armistice Day to honor the veterans of World War I. Later Dwight D Eisenhower changed the name to Veteran’s Day to honor all veterans.

 

 

What is Veterans Day?

A time machine accidentally takes most of the Sharp Wits back in time to 1918 to help them understand what Veterans Day is. They learn the Veterans Day began as Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, the day that World War I ended.

 

There are many more videos available in Safari Montage and Learn360 on this topic.

Ebooks:

 

 

Children’s Book Festival – Author: Nikki Grimes

Check out Nikki Grimes at the upcoming Children’s Book Festival held on November 2 at MCC in Henrietta.

 

 

 

 

(Click books above to link into SORA)

New York Times bestselling author Nikki Grimes is the recipient of the 2017 Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal, the 2016 Virginia Hamilton Literary Award, and the 2006 NCTE Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children. Her distinguished works include the much-honored books Garvey’s Choice, ALA Notable book What is Goodbye?, Coretta Scott King Award winner Bronx Masquerade, and Coretta Scott King Author Honor books Jazmin’s Notebook, Talkin’ About Bessie, Dark SonsWords with Wings, and The Road to Paris. Creator of the popular Meet Danitra Brown, Ms. Grimes lives in Corona, California.

Our overdrive account has 8 of her ebooks and 2 of her audiobooks. You can find 29 author interviews with her on TeachingBooks.net (contact Liesl for login information).

 

LOC Digital Collection on Comic Art

The Library of Congress is highlighting 120 years of comic art.

From as far back as the 1890’s, when the Yellow Kid sparked the idea of sensationalized stories for the sake of selling papers, artists were pushing boundaries and commenting on the political and cultural atmosphere of the time.

The exhibit moves up through the years of Archie, Blondie and Dagwood, Batman, Peanuts and into webcomics of the 2010’s.

Explore the Exhibit

Children’s Book Festival Author Peter Catalanotto

Check out Peter Catalanotto at the upcoming Children’s Book Festival held on November 2 at MCC in Henrietta.

Peter Catalanotto has illustrated 48 books for children, 18 of which he has written, including Emily’s Art, Matthew A.B.C., Ivan the Terrier, and Monkey & Robot. In 2008, First Lady, Laura Bush commissioned Peter to illustrate the White House holiday brochure. Peter currently teaches the first children’s book writing course offered by Columbia University and Pratt Institute. He has also visited over 1600 elementary schools in 40 states where he demonstrates his creative process from inspiration to final book. His newest book, Monkey & Robot, Friends and Neighbors, is due for release this month.

Peter is available to schedule school visits October 31st and November 1st. For details contact Wendy Petry.

Children’s Book Festival Author Jerry Craft

Check out Jerry Craft at the upcoming Children’s Book Festival held annually at MCC in Henrietta.

Author and Illustrator, Jerry Craft, writes the books he wishes he had when he was growing up. New Kid is a middle-grade graphic novel that has earned five starred reviews, including one from Booklist magazine. The book centers around seventh grader, Jordan Banks, whose parents have decided to send him to a prestigious private school where Jordan struggles to fit in.

Jerry is also the creator of the comic strip, Mama’s Boyz, and the middle grade novel, The Offenders: Saving the World While Serving Detention! (which he wrote with his two sons Jayen & Aren).

His website includes a 3 minute interview with him where he discusses his inspiration and how he got started. (Scroll to the very bottom of the home screen to find it.)

Jerry is available to schedule school visits November 4th and 5th. For details contact Wendy Petry.

Children’s Book Festival Author Alyssa Satin Capucilli

Check out Alyssa Satin Capucilli at the upcoming Children’s Book Festival held annually at MCC in Henrietta.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The books above are available in the Monroe One Overdrive account.

Alyssa Satin Capucilli is the author of over 100 books including Biscuit, the popular bestseller used to launch the My First I Can Read Series from HarperCollins. With over twenty-eight million books in print, Biscuit has been deemed a modern classic and has been translated into numerous languages worldwide. Other works include the Katy Duck series, the My First non-fiction photo series and numerous picture books.

There are lots of resources about Alyssa Satin Capucilli, including interviews, a book list, and audio excerpts on teachingbooks.net. If you do not remember our password, please contact me.

Alyssa is available to schedule school visits November 1st (Primary Grades). For details contact Wendy Petry.

 

 

Reflections on RRLC’s “We Need Diverse Libraries”

“Imagine a world where everyone could see themselves in the pages of a book.”

These were the first words of the presentation last Tuesday by We Need Diverse Books. They then asked us to close our eyes for a minute and think about what that would look like. What would you see or hear, and what would that mean for everyone?

The responses from the audience were, “More possibilities would be open to people”; “There would be more avid readers”; “People would know that their narratives are important as well, regardless of their abilities, of what they looked like, or who they were”; “There would be more diversity in careers, in life in general”; “We would see an increase in overall well-being”. It sounds Utopian, doesn’t it? This is within reach.

It can still be difficult to find great books that tell diverse stories, but it is not impossible. The folks at We Need Diverse Books have made it their mission to help us accomplish this goal. If you know where to look it will make your life easier. Some publishers offering diverse reads are:

On their diversebooks.org website is a listing of sites that provide diverse book lists. Under the Resources tab on their site, they also include a book talking kit.

Most helpfully, they have also created an app, currently accessible through your browser, called OurStory, which highlights books with diverse content and by content creators from marginalized communities. It is basically a database designed for you to find books for your libraries.

Look at our Libguide for more resources on diversifying your collection. *The page is currently under construction, so please continue to check back frequently.* Which reminds me: Diversifying your collection is an ongoing process. We live in a constant state of growth and change. Informally audit your collection and add to it frequently.