lbarber140

522 posts

Independent Lens

Independent Lens –

  • (#2112) – “One Child Nation” –airs 3/30 at 10 p.m. – China’s one-child policy forever changed the lives of mothers and children. Inspired by the birth of her first child, filmmaker Nanfu Wang returns to China to speak with her mother and brother, and explore the ripple effect of this social experiment.

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2 Sides Project

2 Sides Project airs 3/25 at 1 a.m. – THE 2 SIDES PROJECT follows the unforgettable journey of six U.S. sons and daughters as they discover a country and a people with whom they share a common history. Over 11 days in December 2015, American and Vietnamese sons and daughters-who had all lost fathers on opposite sides of the war held the first-ever formal meetings. The film captures the entire story, not just the transformative two sides encounters, but the profoundly moving experiences these Americans had while visiting the sites where their fathers died, and the powerful encounters they had with the country itself. The film focuses on the aftermath of the Vietnam War, and provides a unique complement to the Ken Burns series on the war.

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Earth Focus (1000) (6/30 minute programs)

Earth Focus (1000) (6/30 minute programs) airs Tuesdays at 4 a.m. beginning 3/3 – – EARTH FOCUS, a partnership between KCETLink and the Thomson Reuters Foundation provides audiences with urgent local and global environmental coverage that spotlights the issues, impact and possible solutions from a variety of unique perspectives.

  • #1001 – Louisiana is learning from Hurricane Katrina. Forecasts are dire for Louisiana to experience the second-highest sea level rise in the world. There is a big movement brewing in New Orleans to build adaptive “resilience zones.” In Southeast Louisiana, the native peoples of the Isle de Jean Charles have become the first U.S citizens moving within their homeland displaced by climate change.
  • #1002 – Populations are dramatically shifting as climate change drives migration. Droughts and floods are driving many people away from their rural, farming communities into big cities. We see how this is manifesting in Mongolia and examine the factors leading to the new community of Haitian people living in limbo at the border between Mexico and the U.S.
  • #1003 – Two cities, San Francisco and Freetown, brace for climate change using vastly different methodologies. San Francisco’s developers are building expensive real estate on floodplains as officials try to heed expert projections on future sea levels. On the other side of the world, a deadly mudslide caused by torrential rains and deforestation in Sierra Leone shows the consequences of city planning that doesn’t take climate change into account.
  • #1004 – Anticipating future water needs, two regions on opposite sides of the world turn to technology for answers. Western Morocco, near the Sahara Desert, is currently facing unprecedented drought and groundwater mismanagement. But an ancient method of gathering moisture from fog is being taught to 13 villages, allowing people to have a level of local control over their most basic need. Central Valley California: The food basket of the world uses nearly 80 percent of the entire state’s water supply. Yet there are still close to one million people who don’t have access to clean drinking water. Researchers at UCLA may change that through a technology that would allow unincorporated rural communities to control how contaminated water is treated.
  • #1005 – Communities and innovators all over the world are creating new sustainable food sources that are resilient to climate change and growing populations. In Madagascar we see how villagers are closing off marine areas to allow the fish supply to replenish at a natural pace. In San Diego, California, aquaculturists are exploring open ocean farming as a more sustainable model for the fishing industry.
  • #1006 – With so much biodiversity in the highly urban area of Los Angeles, species are thriving despite human interference, and in some cases because of it.

Watch Episode: Dying Oceans Abalone Restortaion in California 

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Nial Ferguson’s Networld

Nial Ferguson’s Networld (3/60 minute programs) – Explore the history of social networks as historian/author Niall Ferguson reveals the intersection of social media, technology and cultural movements. He demonstrates how human behavior, technology and profit can energize ideas and change the world.

  • #101 – Disruption – airs 3/17 at 8 p.m. – Focusing on the great network revolution of our time and the Protestant Reformation, Niall Ferguson untangles important issues surrounding why social media networks polarize us, why some ideas go viral and why truth itself is at a disadvantage.
  • #102 – Winner Takes All – airs 3/17 at 9 p.m. – Looking at lessons from the past, Niall Ferguson tells the story of how a decentralized worldwide web shifted to become a highly profitable network controlled by a tiny elite selling our attention for billions to the world’s advertisers.
  • #103 – Networld War – airs 3/17 at 10 p.m. – Focusing on the geopolitics of our interconnected world, with lessons from terrorism and surveillance, Niall Ferguson shows how our democracies are under threat from forces that exploit and weaponize the social networks that we invented.

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Amazing Grace

Amazing Grace airs 3/18 at 1 a.m. – “Amazing Grace” explores the treatment of women in the legal industry from the late 1940’s through today. Specifically, it follows the story of Missouri Attorney Grace Day who was the lone woman in her law school class in 1948 and endured torment from her professors and peers. You’ll fall in love with Grace Day, a woman who won over her enemies and helped blaze a path for future women lawyers.

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