Library News

5 posts

Macmillan ebooks Embargo

As I’m sure you’ve heard, Macmillan Publishing has already begun its embargo against library ebooks as of November 1st. If you haven’t heard, let’s catch you up: Read/listen to this NPR story by Lynn Neary.

In a nutshell, Macmillan Publishers is restricting libraries from purchasing more than one copy of an ebook during the first 8-weeks of publishing. Libraries are allowed to purchase one perpetual-use copy at the regular retail price (normally libraries pay much more for an ebook). After the 8-week embargo, they are allowed to purchase more copies at the regular library cost. This has caused a wave of criticism from libraries across the nation and from ALA, whose central mission is: equitable access for all.

Mark Smith, the Texas State Librarian, provided a really great overview in his blog post from Monday, November 4th after meeting with Macmillan CEO, John Sargent. He explains Mr. Sargent’s thinking about the situation, but ties up his post by showing how if there are no repercussions for Macmillan implementing this model, other ebook vendors might adopt the same policies. This type of purchasing model from ebook vendors has the potential to disrupt library ebook lending for all libraries. This includes school libraries.

As school librarians in 2019, we have enough trouble getting students to become lifelong readers. Making them wait 8 weeks longer for the book they want is not going to help us.

There is a petition circulating around social media library groups that is housed on www.ebooksforall.org. If you sign it, you’ll receive an email from the ALA stating “We ask you to share your experiences with the embargo now that it is in effect. Screenshot your waitlist and share your story on the #eBooksForAll hashtag about how the embargo is impacting your community.

You play a vital role in ALA’s advocacy work. If you haven’t already signed up as an advocate, please do so here: http://bit.ly/ALAadvocate2019. And be sure to follow ALA on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram to stay up-to-date on all of our ongoing efforts and, in particular, the progress of this campaign.” We urge you to be an advocate for library ebooks.

LOC Digital Collection on Comic Art

The Library of Congress is highlighting 120 years of comic art.

From as far back as the 1890’s, when the Yellow Kid sparked the idea of sensationalized stories for the sake of selling papers, artists were pushing boundaries and commenting on the political and cultural atmosphere of the time.

The exhibit moves up through the years of Archie, Blondie and Dagwood, Batman, Peanuts and into webcomics of the 2010’s.

Explore the Exhibit

U.S. Poet Laureate: Joy Harjo

On September 19th, U.S. Librarian of Congress Dr. Carla Hayden, named Joy Harjo the Nation’s 23rd Poet Laureate. Harjo is a member of the Muscogee Creek Nation and is the first Native American to serve as U.S. Poet Laureate.

The Poet Laureate serves as the official poet of the United States, and is appointed annually by the Librarian of Congress. In this position, the poet is tasked with raising public appreciation for poetry writing and reading.

She succeeds Tracy K. Smith who served for two consecutive years.

 

Library News of the Week 9/10/19

Among all of the news in libraries this week, these three items stood out the most:

NYLA Conference Registration is open for the 2019 NYLA Annual Conference and Trade Show. It will be held in Saratoga Springs, NY from November 13-16. Filmmaker Astra Taylor will keynote, speaking about the nature of democracy. For more information, visit: www.nyla.org.

AASL Conference If NYLA isn’t your thing, and you’re able to get there, the AASL Conference is open for registration as well. Held November 14-16 in Louisville, this conference features three keynote speakers and over 150 concurrent sessions specific to school librarians. Also note: a complimentary administrator registration is available with every full conference registration. For more information, visit: national.aasl.org/registration/

Library Card Sign-up Month September is Library Card Sign-up Month (since 1987). ALA and libraries unite in a national effort to ensure every child signs-up for their own library card. Find out more and download the press kit at: ala.org. Note: your students can use their new public library cards with their SORA accounts to enhance their ebook and audiobook options.