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Lazy People Saving the World

The UN has a series of Sustainable Development Goals for the health of our future. These include:

  1. No Poverty
  2. Zero Hunger
  3. Good Health and Well-Being
  4. Quality Education
  5. Gender Equality
  6. Clean Water and Sanitation
  7. Affordable and Clean Energy
  8. Decent Work and Economic Growth
  9. Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure
  10. Reduced Inequalities
  11. Sustainable Cities and Communities
  12. Responsible Consumption and Production
  13. Climate Action
  14. Life Below Water
  15. Life on Land
  16. Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
  17. Partnerships

To meet these goals, they have developed a number of plans. These include the ActNow Campaign – supporting climate action, the Be the Change Initiative – which includes a Be the Change Challenge Toolkit, and, my personal favorite, the Lazy Person’s Guide to Saving the World. This guide lays out four different levels of action.

Level 1: Things you can do from your couch.

Level 2: Things you can do at home

Level 3: Things you can do outside your house

Level 4: Things you can do at work

To see details of what you can do at each of these levels, check out their website, or download and print out the .pdf.

Three Apples Bookmarks

The Three Apples Book Awards were developed to encourage the joy of reading for pleasure, and to give the children and teens in New York State the opportunity to participate in honoring their favorite books. These awards, in the three categories for Young Readers, Children, and Teens, are sponsored by the School Library Media Section of the New York State Library Association, which represents the school libraries of the state.

The Three Apples Committee just released their three bookmarks (pictured below). Click on each one to open a printable copy.

Students have until April to read the titles, and voting takes place in April.

Any questions? Contact Liesl for who to contact. She doesn’t want to post that person’s email address here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about 3 Apples, and other book awards, check out our LibGuide!

NPR Student Podcast Challenge


Last spring, NPR’s education team held a student podcast challenge. 55,000 students entered, of which, they announced two winners. Well, they’re bringing the contest back!

NPR is launching the 2nd annual student podcast challenge.

Students are invited to create a podcast – with the help of a teacher – and enter for a chance to win a grand prize and have their work showcased on NPR’s Morning Edition or All Things Considered. The contest is for students between grades 5 and 12. Each podcast should be between 3 and 12 minutes long, and it can be about ANYTHING.

For complete information on the contest, how it works, the rules, FAQ’s, and submission info see: https://www.npr.org/2018/11/15/650500116/npr-student-podcast-challenge-home

Listen to last year’s winners:

Murderous Mary & The RISE Of Erwin by four high school students in Elizabethton, TN

Marshmallow – by 8th grade Bronx Prep Middle School students

After you’ve entered your podcast into the NPR Student Podcast Challenge, enter it into the Digies as well.

2020 School Librarian of the Year

The search is on for the 2020 School Librarian of the Year!

This award honors a K-12 library professional for outstanding achievement in school library services. To be considered, applicants must be certified school librarians – as recognized by the state of NY – and be working in a public or private school. (Directors, supervisors and managers of library programs are not eligible).

Winners will receive a cash award of $2,500, plus $2,500 in-kind digital or print products for their library. The winner will also receive a bunch of books from John Schumacher, Ambassador of School Libraries, Scholastic. Travel to participate in a 2020 Scholastic Book Fairs Summer Reading Summit (airfare, one night hotel stay and registration) is also included.

Winners will be judged based on their service to fulfill the needs of students and the community, creativity in programming, integration of library services within the curricula, technology integration and other criteria.

Nominations close on December 2nd. Winners will be announced in March.

For more information on how to apply go to www.slj.com.

Children’s Book Festival – Author: Nikki Grimes

Check out Nikki Grimes at the upcoming Children’s Book Festival held on November 2 at MCC in Henrietta.

 

 

 

 

(Click books above to link into SORA)

New York Times bestselling author Nikki Grimes is the recipient of the 2017 Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal, the 2016 Virginia Hamilton Literary Award, and the 2006 NCTE Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children. Her distinguished works include the much-honored books Garvey’s Choice, ALA Notable book What is Goodbye?, Coretta Scott King Award winner Bronx Masquerade, and Coretta Scott King Author Honor books Jazmin’s Notebook, Talkin’ About Bessie, Dark SonsWords with Wings, and The Road to Paris. Creator of the popular Meet Danitra Brown, Ms. Grimes lives in Corona, California.

Our overdrive account has 8 of her ebooks and 2 of her audiobooks. You can find 29 author interviews with her on TeachingBooks.net (contact Liesl for login information).

 

Ada Lovelace Day

Today is Ada Lovelace Day! Born in 1815, Ada was a gifted mathematician and wrote instructions for the first computer program in the mid-1800’s. She is remembered for her work with Charles Babbage on the analytical engine.

To celebrate, read one of the many books about Ada Lovelace – Ada Lovelace, Poet of Science by Diane Stanley (available in our Overdrive collection), Dreaming in Code by Emily Arnold McCully, Ada’s Ideas by Fiona Robinson or Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine by Laurie Wallmark.

Then try Ada’s Poetry Generator, which teaches students how to program a poetry generator in Scratch.

Reflections on RRLC’s “We Need Diverse Libraries”

“Imagine a world where everyone could see themselves in the pages of a book.”

These were the first words of the presentation last Tuesday by We Need Diverse Books. They then asked us to close our eyes for a minute and think about what that would look like. What would you see or hear, and what would that mean for everyone?

The responses from the audience were, “More possibilities would be open to people”; “There would be more avid readers”; “People would know that their narratives are important as well, regardless of their abilities, of what they looked like, or who they were”; “There would be more diversity in careers, in life in general”; “We would see an increase in overall well-being”. It sounds Utopian, doesn’t it? This is within reach.

It can still be difficult to find great books that tell diverse stories, but it is not impossible. The folks at We Need Diverse Books have made it their mission to help us accomplish this goal. If you know where to look it will make your life easier. Some publishers offering diverse reads are:

On their diversebooks.org website is a listing of sites that provide diverse book lists. Under the Resources tab on their site, they also include a book talking kit.

Most helpfully, they have also created an app, currently accessible through your browser, called OurStory, which highlights books with diverse content and by content creators from marginalized communities. It is basically a database designed for you to find books for your libraries.

Look at our Libguide for more resources on diversifying your collection. *The page is currently under construction, so please continue to check back frequently.* Which reminds me: Diversifying your collection is an ongoing process. We live in a constant state of growth and change. Informally audit your collection and add to it frequently.

U.S. Poet Laureate: Joy Harjo

On September 19th, U.S. Librarian of Congress Dr. Carla Hayden, named Joy Harjo the Nation’s 23rd Poet Laureate. Harjo is a member of the Muscogee Creek Nation and is the first Native American to serve as U.S. Poet Laureate.

The Poet Laureate serves as the official poet of the United States, and is appointed annually by the Librarian of Congress. In this position, the poet is tasked with raising public appreciation for poetry writing and reading.

She succeeds Tracy K. Smith who served for two consecutive years.

 

Monroe One BOCES SLS Need-to-Know News

The SLS MiniGrant deadline is this Friday, October 4th!

Each applicant may request up to $1,200 in grant funds. The awards will be announced on October 15th and must be completed by March 23rd, 2020.

Allowable mini-grant projects include:

  • Collection Development
  • Innovative Projects
  • Professional Development Programs

For more information about the grant application and process, please visit our website: www.monroe.edu/sls

 

The Re-imagined ESIFC

There is still room to register for the Re-Imagining Information Fluency and Standards Alignment for our Students.

As school librarians, we know we must teach our students the skills they need to succeed in the ever-changing and complex information environment. The Empire State Information Fluency Continuum (ESIFC) has been re-imagined to provide a guide for that teaching; it is a comprehensive PD-12 continuum of the skills, responsibilities, and dispositions that will enable our students to flourish, both personally and academically. The skills of the ESIFC will align with the expectations of various national and New York State standards documents, including NextGen science standards, New York’s Social Studies and ELA standards, and AASL and ISTE standards.

In this workshop, we will explore the new ESIFC and translate it into action. You will discover essential skills of inquiry, multiple literacies, design thinking, social responsibility, and even student agency. Most importantly, you will be able to collaborate with colleagues to develop personalized approaches, lessons, formative assessments, and strategies to transform teaching and learning in your school.

The event will be held on October 10th, 2019.

 

***Reminder: Our SLS Council meeting will be held on Thursday, October 3rd from 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm.