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NPR Student Podcast Challenge


Last spring, NPR’s education team held a student podcast challenge. 55,000 students entered, of which, they announced two winners. Well, they’re bringing the contest back!

NPR is launching the 2nd annual student podcast challenge.

Students are invited to create a podcast – with the help of a teacher – and enter for a chance to win a grand prize and have their work showcased on NPR’s Morning Edition or All Things Considered. The contest is for students between grades 5 and 12. Each podcast should be between 3 and 12 minutes long, and it can be about ANYTHING.

For complete information on the contest, how it works, the rules, FAQ’s, and submission info see: https://www.npr.org/2018/11/15/650500116/npr-student-podcast-challenge-home

Listen to last year’s winners:

Murderous Mary & The RISE Of Erwin by four high school students in Elizabethton, TN

Marshmallow – by 8th grade Bronx Prep Middle School students

After you’ve entered your podcast into the NPR Student Podcast Challenge, enter it into the Digies as well.

Macmillan ebooks Embargo

As I’m sure you’ve heard, Macmillan Publishing has already begun its embargo against library ebooks as of November 1st. If you haven’t heard, let’s catch you up: Read/listen to this NPR story by Lynn Neary.

In a nutshell, Macmillan Publishers is restricting libraries from purchasing more than one copy of an ebook during the first 8-weeks of publishing. Libraries are allowed to purchase one perpetual-use copy at the regular retail price (normally libraries pay much more for an ebook). After the 8-week embargo, they are allowed to purchase more copies at the regular library cost. This has caused a wave of criticism from libraries across the nation and from ALA, whose central mission is: equitable access for all.

Mark Smith, the Texas State Librarian, provided a really great overview in his blog post from Monday, November 4th after meeting with Macmillan CEO, John Sargent. He explains Mr. Sargent’s thinking about the situation, but ties up his post by showing how if there are no repercussions for Macmillan implementing this model, other ebook vendors might adopt the same policies. This type of purchasing model from ebook vendors has the potential to disrupt library ebook lending for all libraries. This includes school libraries.

As school librarians in 2019, we have enough trouble getting students to become lifelong readers. Making them wait 8 weeks longer for the book they want is not going to help us.

There is a petition circulating around social media library groups that is housed on www.ebooksforall.org. If you sign it, you’ll receive an email from the ALA stating “We ask you to share your experiences with the embargo now that it is in effect. Screenshot your waitlist and share your story on the #eBooksForAll hashtag about how the embargo is impacting your community.

You play a vital role in ALA’s advocacy work. If you haven’t already signed up as an advocate, please do so here: http://bit.ly/ALAadvocate2019. And be sure to follow ALA on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram to stay up-to-date on all of our ongoing efforts and, in particular, the progress of this campaign.” We urge you to be an advocate for library ebooks.

Frontline Films Online

Do you ever happen to see something on FRONTLINE that would work perfectly with your students?

FRONTLINE films are investigative, journalistic documentaries that often air on PBS. These films cover current events, and uncover stories that are often untold. They’ve won 91 Emmy awards and 22 Peabody awards. They have also posted over 200 of their films online for you to watch FOR FREE whenever you want.

Find them at: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/

A few of their listed titles are:

  • Fire in Paradise
  • In the Age of AI
  • Flint’s Deadly Water
  • Documenting Hate: Charlottesville
  • Documenting Hate: New American Nazis
  • The Trouble with Chicken

… And So Much More!!!

Veterans Day

Veterans Day is coming up on Monday. Originally called, Armistice Day, it commemorated the end of the fighting of World War I, when the Allies and Germany put an armistice into effect on the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month”. It was a day to honor veterans of World War I. However, World War II happened, and then the Korean War after that. In 1954, it was renamed Veterans Day to honor American veterans of all wars.

Since World War I was an international conflict, this is a day that our allies also celebrate. Britain, Canada, and Australia all celebrate “Remembrance Day” on or around November 11.

Lange, Katie. “5 Facts to Know About Veterans Day.” U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, 5 Nov. 2018,
www.defense.gov/explore/story/article/1675470/5-facts-to-know-about-veterans-day/.

We have lots of resources for you and your students about Veterans Day.

Videos:

 

Armistice Day and Veteran’s Day

Woodrow Wilson declared November 11th Armistice Day to honor the veterans of World War I. Later Dwight D Eisenhower changed the name to Veteran’s Day to honor all veterans.

 

 

What is Veterans Day?

A time machine accidentally takes most of the Sharp Wits back in time to 1918 to help them understand what Veterans Day is. They learn the Veterans Day began as Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, the day that World War I ended.

 

There are many more videos available in Safari Montage and Learn360 on this topic.

Ebooks:

 

 

2020 School Librarian of the Year

The search is on for the 2020 School Librarian of the Year!

This award honors a K-12 library professional for outstanding achievement in school library services. To be considered, applicants must be certified school librarians – as recognized by the state of NY – and be working in a public or private school. (Directors, supervisors and managers of library programs are not eligible).

Winners will receive a cash award of $2,500, plus $2,500 in-kind digital or print products for their library. The winner will also receive a bunch of books from John Schumacher, Ambassador of School Libraries, Scholastic. Travel to participate in a 2020 Scholastic Book Fairs Summer Reading Summit (airfare, one night hotel stay and registration) is also included.

Winners will be judged based on their service to fulfill the needs of students and the community, creativity in programming, integration of library services within the curricula, technology integration and other criteria.

Nominations close on December 2nd. Winners will be announced in March.

For more information on how to apply go to www.slj.com.

Reimagining Library Spaces

Genesee Valley Educational Partnership is working on a program for the 5 systems region called “Reimagining Library Spaces”. This program will be led by Diana Rendina, a Library Media Specialist at Tampa Preparatory School, an independent 6-12 school in Tampa, Florida. She an author, and the creator of the Renovated Learning blog. This workshop will focus on transforming your library space.

Many school libraries still look like they did fifty years ago. But our libraries are no longer quiet dusty book repositories. Librarians are leading the way in technology use and modern pedagogy in our schools – now we need to update our spaces to match.

In this workshop, you will get ideas and inspiration for transforming the physical space of your libraries to make them innovative, student-friendly learning environments. We’ll talk about how to apply learning space design theory to renovate your library. You’ll learn how to survey your students, create a focus group, and use design thinking to brainstorm ideas for your space. We’ll spend time brainstorming our spaces and making plans for the future. Participants will be able to explain why changes to the physical space are needed and will learn strategies that they can apply immediately, no matter what their budget. This workshop will leave you feeling empowered to make the changes that are needed in our library spaces.

The date for this workshop is March 20, 2020.

Click to register

 

Children’s Book Festival – Author: Nikki Grimes

Check out Nikki Grimes at the upcoming Children’s Book Festival held on November 2 at MCC in Henrietta.

 

 

 

 

(Click books above to link into SORA)

New York Times bestselling author Nikki Grimes is the recipient of the 2017 Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal, the 2016 Virginia Hamilton Literary Award, and the 2006 NCTE Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children. Her distinguished works include the much-honored books Garvey’s Choice, ALA Notable book What is Goodbye?, Coretta Scott King Award winner Bronx Masquerade, and Coretta Scott King Author Honor books Jazmin’s Notebook, Talkin’ About Bessie, Dark SonsWords with Wings, and The Road to Paris. Creator of the popular Meet Danitra Brown, Ms. Grimes lives in Corona, California.

Our overdrive account has 8 of her ebooks and 2 of her audiobooks. You can find 29 author interviews with her on TeachingBooks.net (contact Liesl for login information).

 

Media Literacy Week Reflection and Action

Last week was Media Literacy Week. What we gathered from the survey we sent out, is that teachers and librarians strongly feel that Media Literacy Education is important for our students. So what can we do to further push Media Literacy Education in schools? Take legislative action.

There are currently proposed bills in the New York Assembly and Senate:

  • Assembly Bill 2219 – School districts would be provided with a list of resources and instructional materials on media literacy.
  • Senate Bill 1104 – Required instruction in civics, civility and citizenship, including media literacy.
  • Assembly Bill 106 – Appointment of a media literacy advisory committee.
  • Assembly Bill 5981A – To study the teaching of digital citizenship, internet safety, and media literacy.

Read more about these bills here.

Senate Resolution J01888, which was adopted in June, proclaimed October 2019 ‘Information Literacy Month’ in the state of New York.

So what can you do?

Check out Media Literacy Now to advocate for Media Literacy Education in our state. This website will help you with any materials you need and provide you with information about Media Literacy and Media Literacy Education advocacy.

LOC Digital Collection on Comic Art

The Library of Congress is highlighting 120 years of comic art.

From as far back as the 1890’s, when the Yellow Kid sparked the idea of sensationalized stories for the sake of selling papers, artists were pushing boundaries and commenting on the political and cultural atmosphere of the time.

The exhibit moves up through the years of Archie, Blondie and Dagwood, Batman, Peanuts and into webcomics of the 2010’s.

Explore the Exhibit

Upcoming Workshops

Check out our upcoming workshops. (Click a title to open the registration page).

Create and Code Interactive Stories with Twine
This workshop has three portions to it. The series will open tomorrow with a webinar that runs from 3:00 – 3:45 pm. Registrants will receive a Zoom link tomorrow morning. During this time, we will introduce you to Twine and orient you to the program. We already have enough registrations to run it. There are a few spots left, so if you’re interested in registering, please do.

The second day in the series will be Wednesday (Oct. 30th). This will be in person here at 11 Linden from 3:30 – 5 pm. We will copy-code together and write an interactive story together while you learn to program the software.

The last session will be a facilitated work time, held on November 13th from 3:00 to 5:00 pm (again, here at 11 Linden), where you can come and work on a lesson or a story, and we will be there to help you with any questions you might have.

Intermediate LibGuides
November 5th from 3:30 – 4:30 pm

We will spend a small amount of time reviewing what we already know, and then we will move into color themes, banners, alternate box types, and generally honing and customizing the look and style of your guides. This will be customized to the attendees as best we can.

Library Makers: Sphero Robots
December 10th from 3:30 – 5 pm

Sphero are little round robotic balls that are not only fun, but can be used effectively in education. In this 1.5 hour hands-on workshop, attendees will learn to control Sphero, code with Sphero, and practice and discuss ways to use it to strengthen math and coding concepts.

Create Forms & Surveys for your LibGuides
December 19th from 3:30 – 4:30 pm

Learn to create forms and surveys using LibWizard. These forms and surveys can embedded into your LibGuides or library websites. This feature makes it easy to collect data or create sign-ups.

Mini Green Screens in Your Classroom
January 28th from 3:30 – 5 pm

Have you just eaten some pizza and don’t know what to do with the empty pizza box? Well one man’s garbage is another man’s Green Screen Studio! Join our workshop (where we will be using fresh, clean pizza boxes), and learn some great uses for green screen technology, made simply and easily.

Using iMovie on the iPad, we will teach you best practices when recording and talk about ways to integrate green screen technology into your teaching. We will also give information on how to borrow iPads from our multimedia department. This is a hands-on workshop, and each participant will take home a green screen pizza box.

 

Our Model Schools department also offers workshops for educators. Click here for a full listing.