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America Reframed #514 “Deej”

WXXI World

Deej is the story of DJ Savarese (“Deej”), a gifted, young writer and advocate for nonspeaking autistics. Once a “profoundly disabled” foster kid on a fast track to nowhere, DJ is now a first-year college student who insists on standing up for his peers: people who are dismissed as incompetent because they are neurologically diverse. Will Deej be able to find freedom for himself and others like him?

Airs on WXXI-World December 18, 2018 at 8:00 pm
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El Cap Report

 https://www.facebook.com/ElCapReportTheFilm/  – El Cap Report looks at the sometimes inspiring and sometimes frightening stories of the men and women who climb El Capitan in Yosemite National Park. Included is the now famous and historic Dawn Wall project, known as “the hardest climb in the world.” This is not a “climbing” film per se, but rather a film about climbers that looks into their emotional and psychological motivations for risking their lives in the pursuit of adventure.

Airs 12/18 at 1-2 a.m.

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Iroquois

(4/30 minute programs) – The series, much of which was filmed on Iroquois reservations, explores different aspects of Iroquois culture including the oral storytelling tradition and its historical significance, as well as Iroquois art, education and political issues.

Airs Wednesdays 4-5 a.m. beginning 12/19.

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  • #1 – The Oral Tradition
  • #2 – Art of the Seventh Generation
  • #3 – Educating the Children
  • #4 – Keepers of the Eastern Door

A Time to Heal

 – http://atimetoheal.wpsu.org/  – explores the impact of the Vietnam War on the lives of those who fought, protested, or prayed for their loved ones to come home alive. Producer Lindsey Whissel Fenton travels across Pennsylvania, talking with men and women about their experiences in that divisive war and their perspectives now, seeking an answer to the question: is it finally a time to heal?

Airs 12/14 at 3-4 a.m.

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Crowd in the Cloud

(4/60 minute programs) – https://www.pbs.org/show/crowd-cloud/  – THE CROWD & THE CLOUD is a documentary series showcasing the power of Citizen Science in the Digital Age. This multi-part series, hosted by former NASA Chief Scientist Waleed Abdalati, takes viewers on a global tour of the projects and people on the front lines of citizen science and crowdsourcing. By observing their environment, monitoring neighborhoods, and collecting information about the world around them,citizens are helping professional scientists advance knowledge while speeding up new discoveries and innovations.

Airs Thursdays 4-5 a.m. beginning 12/13.

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  • #1 – 20,000 volunteers across the U.S. measure precipitation: when extreme weather hits, emergency managers turn their data into life-saving alerts. Armchair mappers worldwide update information used by first responders after the Nepal earthquake. A new project, EyesOnALZ, enlists the crowd to speed up research on Alzheimer’s disease. DIY enthusiasts from Public Lab map the BP oil spill with kites, balloons and cameras and continue to watchdog pollution. The crowd, using mobile tech and the cloud contribute to science that saves lives.
  • #2 – Citizen scientists track air and water pollution at fracking sites in windswept Wyoming and five other states, using simple but science-based techniques developed by the “Bucket Brigade.” On idyllic East Coast trout streams, volunteers from Trout Unlimited monitor water quality regularly, generating baseline data that will prove invaluable in the event of future pollution events. Community members connected with professional researchers to tackle Flint’s drinking water crisis and now the same is happening in Philadelphia and other cities. In China, citizens use government data and a unique mobile app to report environmental crimes. When citizens and scientists partner, it’s a win-win for all concerned.
  • #3 – Sensors on asthma inhalers generate real-time maps of environmental dangers to help patients, physicians and disease detectives in Louisville, Kentucky. Street knowledge was also crucial in a historic medical breakthrough: John Snow’s mapping of cholera fatalities in 19th century London. In West Oakland, California, citizens confront air pollution and rising asthma rates by collecting traffic data. Local ordinances are changed and everyone breathes easier. Can apps and maps combat globalized diseases in a warming world? Stories of citizen science fighting mosquito-borne diseases with apps and crowd-sourced data in Barcelona, Houston and New Orleans. In Kenya, Medic Mobile develops smart but low-cost software to give simple phones powerful capabilities to help community health workers improve maternal and child health.
  • #4 – Counting birds for more than 100 years generates data on a changing climate and there’s an app for that: eBird. Surfer science using smart tech tracks ocean acidification and coastal temperatures in the Smartfin project, a recent startup. We spend “A Year in the Life of Citizen Science” including a Thanksgiving Monarch Butterfly Watch in California. Seasonal change is tracked by Latina and Native American teens in springtime in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and horseshoe crabs are surveyed in summer by retirees along mid-Atlantic coasts. In Uganda, World Bank economists and local partners generate data for sustainable development. The far-ranging potential of “Citizen Science in the Digital Age.”

The Place of Refuge

This documentary shines a light on more than 40% of all children in our country affected by divorce. The Place of Refuge, filmed by an Emmy award-winning film maker, informs parents what they can do to help prevent emotional pain, trauma, behavioral and learning problems often experienced by children. The film presents new findings and perspectives based on the latest research.

Airs 12/12 at 4-4:30 a.m.

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Letters from Baghdad

http://lettersfrombaghdadthemovie.com/  – is the story of a true original – Gertrude Bell – sometimes called the female “Lawrence of Arabia.” More influential and famous in her day than her colleague Lawrence, Bell was an explorer, spy, archaeologist and diplomat who helped shape the Middle East after World War I and established the Iraq Museum, infamously ransacked in 2003. Advisor to Winston Churchill and outspoken critic of colonial policies in Iraq, Bell was considered the most powerful woman in the British Empire. Voiced and executive produced by Academy award winning Tilda Swinton, the film uses stunning, never-seen-before footage of the region to immerse the viewer in Bell’s world. The story is told entirely in the words of Bell and her contemporaries, excerpted from letters, private diaries, and official documents. LETTERS FROM BAGHDAD chronicles Bell’s extraordinary journey into both the uncharted Arabian desert and the inner sanctum of British Colonial power. The film takes us into a past that is eerily current. Why has Bell been written out of the history she helped make?

Airs 12/11 at 9 p.m.

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The American St. Nick

WXXI HD http://www.wwiifoundation.org/category/films/american-saint-nick/

World War II exacted a heavy toll on the people of Wiltz, Luxembourg, nearly destroying the small town. Occupied by German forces for four years, the town was subject to the whims of Nazi leadership: streets were renamed, the native language was banned, religious freedoms were curtailed, and Saint Nicolas Day was outlawed. The documentary THE AMERICAN SAINT NICK chronicles a day at the height of the war when the battle-weary 28th Infantry Division of the American Army returned hope and joy to the children and people of this war-torn town. On Dec.5, 1944, American soldiers, led by Harry Stuts, put their guns down for one day and organized a party celebrating the town’s centuries-old Saint Nick tradition. Soldiers made hot chocolate from their D-rations, company cooks made donuts and cookies for the children, and 22-year-old corporal Richard Brookins from Rochester, NY played the role of Saint Nick. An emotional and heartfelt story, THE AMERICAN SAINT NICK illustrates how American soldiers and residents of the hamlet were able to bond over a moment in time, creating a tradition that continues to this day. The documentary THE AMERICAN SAINT NICK chronicles a day at the height of the war when the battle-weary 28th Infantry Division of the American Army returned hope and joy to the children and people of this war-torn town. On Dec.5, 1944, American soldiers, led by Harry Stuts, put their guns down for one day and organized a party celebrating the town’s centuries-old Saint Nick tradition. Soldiers made hot chocolate from their D-rations, company cooks made donuts and cookies for the children, and 22-year-old corporal Richard Brookins from Rochester, NY played the role of Saint Nick. An emotional and heartfelt story, THE AMERICAN SAINT NICK illustrates how American soldiers and residents of the hamlet were able to bond over a moment in time, creating a tradition that continues to this day.

Airs 12/11 at 8 p.m. and 12/15 at 4 p.m.

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Chaplains

WXXI World

http://journeyfilms.com/chaplains/  – takes the viewer into the dynamic world of chaplains-men and women who represent their own particular faith tradition, but are trained to be of comfort and support to everyone-religious or not. Through personal profiles, the documentary explores the daily life of chaplains throughout society, from their role in the military and the workplace to their work in prisons and behind-the-scenes of NASCAR. With a tradition dating back centuries, chaplains today are on the front lines-often in the midst of life and death situations- where the questions are the deepest, and the need for spiritual and pastoral care the greatest. The film provides a window into religious diversity in America today and the murky nature of the American principle of separation of religion and state.

  • #101 – airs 12/11 at 6 p.m.; 12/15 at 12 p.m. and 12/16 at 4 a.m.
  • #102 – airs 12/11 at 7 p.m./ 12 15 at 1 p.m. and 12/16 at 5 a.m.