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2020-2021 School Year

What a crazy return to school! We are seeing all sorts of models working throughout our region, and while it can sometimes be frustrating, remember it is also worthwhile. All of your hard work is already making a difference in the lives of your students.

Some information you should know about our SLS this year…

  • If you have Follett questions, please contact Liesl. Sally is out for a few weeks.
  • You can start requesting off-air recording again. Luke is hard at work listing the WXXI programming on our Off-Air page.
  • We are working to create a LibGuide listing all of our ebooks that can be checked out by unlimited students at the same time. This LibGuide can be found here: https://libguides.monroe.edu/SORA/Simultaneous

We are here to support you. Please reach out if you need anything!

Frederick Douglass Newspapers Digital Collection from Library of Congress

The Library of Congress has digitized a number of its collections, making it accessible to the public at all times. These are great ways to get primary source documents into the hands of your students. Being in Rochester, today we highlight the collection of newspapers edited by Frederick Douglass.

These three papers were:

The North Star (Rochester, N.Y.), 1847-1851

Frederick Douglass’ Paper (Rochester, N.Y.), 1851-1860

New National Era (Washington, D.C.), 1870-1874

 

Frederick Douglass Digital Collection from the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress has digitized a number of its collections, making it accessible to the public at all times. Being in Rochester, today we highlight the collection of papers from abolitionist, Frederick Douglass. Frederick Douglass escaped from slavery and went on to become one of the most famous public speakers in the United States. The papers in this collection span the years of 1862 to 1865.

The collection is organized in the following series:

  • Diary. A single diary that Douglass kept during his tour of Europe and Africa, 1886-87.
  • Family Papers. A highlight is the biography of Anna Murray Douglass, Frederick Douglass’s wife of forty-four years, written by their daughter, Rosetta Douglass Sprague.
  • General Correspondence.  Includes letters Douglass received from prominent reformers and politicians, including Susan B. Anthony, Grover Cleveland, William Lloyd Garrison, Benjamin Harrison, Russell Lant, Gerrit Smith, and Ida B. Wells.
  • Subject File.  Reveals Douglass’s interests in diverse subjects such as politics, racial prejudice, and prison reform.
  • Speech, Article and Book File.  Contains the writings of Douglass and his contemporaries in the abolitionist and women’s rights movements and includes autographed copies of editorials and opinion pieces from Douglass’ antislavery weekly, North Star, and a partial handwritten draft of Douglass’s third autobiography, The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass.
  • Financial Papers.  Includes bank books, receipts, checks, ledgers, contracts, stocks and bonds, and insurance policies.
  • Legal File.  Holds wills, deeds, mortgages, copyrights, lawsuits, and miscellaneous legal documents.
  • Miscellany.  Includes newspaper clippings and photographs.
  • Addition I.  Includes scrapbooks that document Douglass’s role as minister to Haiti and the controversy surrounding his interracial second marriage.

For further reading, our SORA account also has a number of books about the life of Frederick Douglass, a few copies of his autobiography, and a book about his friendship with Abraham Lincoln.

Susan B. Anthony Digital Collection from the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress has digitized a number of its collections, making it accessible to the public at all times. Being in Rochester, today we highlight the collection of papers from suffragist, Susan B. Anthony. The papers in this collection span the years of 1846 – 1934.

A finding aid (PDF and HTML) to the Susan B. Anthony Papers is available online with links to the digital content on this site.

The collection is arranged in five series (though the last one is not available digitally as of yet):

Rochester Teen Film Festival

CALL FOR ENTRIES!

WXXI Public Broadcasting Council and the Little Theatre are proud to announce and invite entries for the 2019 Rochester Teen Film Festival, a collaborative, juried media competition for youth in the Rochester region.

Complete information on the festival can be found here: https://www.wxxi.org/teenfilmfestival 

ENTRIES DUE: June 12, 2020.

Submissions for This Year Will Be Active Soon.

GUIDELINES:

SAVE THE DATE!

WXXI Public Broadcasting Council and the Little Theatre are proud to sponsor the 2020 Rochester Teen Film Festival, a collaborative, juried media competition for youth (13-18 years old) in the Rochester region.

The festival is set for Thursday, August 6, 2020 at 5:30 p.m

The finalists’ films will be shown at the Little Theatre in downtown Rochester. Printable Poster -Download Here.  Ticket information will be available closer to August.

GUIDELINES:

  • Films and videos are created by high school teens
  • All genres are welcome
  • Videos must be appropriate for school-based audiences
  • Videos cannot exceed 10 minutes

The purpose of the festival is to honor the work of urban, suburban and rural teen filmmakers and give young people an authentic opportunity to participate in a real film festival. All submissions are judged by a jury and finalists have been elected to have their films shown at the Little Theatre.

This year, young filmmakers will again have a chance to earn the Philip Seymour Hoffman Award, which honors the life and legacy of the late Academy Award-winning actor and Fairport, N.Y. native. The annual award is given to the teen whose film is chosen by the judges as “Best of Fest” and was established in association with the Hoffman family.

Monroe One SLS Webinars week of April 13-17

We hope you’re all staying healthy. The following is the list of webinars offered for librarians and educators in the Monroe One BOCES region, with links to register:

 

Accessing the Monroe One BOCES Overdrive Collection with SORA

Monday April 13, 2020  |  2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Register in MLP: https://www.mylearningplan.com/WebReg/ActivityProfile.asp?D=13458&I=3459326

 

School Librarian Meetup

Tuesday April 14, 2020  |  1:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Register here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeUudIDIcV1phHYBoy7I-J3CKdi_CR_2TmQ4AjCHcD5M3F7cQ/viewform?usp=sf_link

 

Video Resources in SAFARI Montage

Wednesday April 15, 2020  |  1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Register in MLP: https://www.mylearningplan.com/WebReg/ActivityProfile.asp?D=13458&I=3457979

 

Getting Started with LibGuides (FOR LIBRARIANS ONLY)

Friday April 17, 2020  |  10:00 am – 11:00 am

Register in MLP: https://www.mylearningplan.com/WebReg/ActivityProfile.asp?D=13458&I=3459774

 

LibGuides User Group (FOR LIBRARIANS ONLY)

Friday April 17, 2020  |  1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Register in MLP: https://www.mylearningplan.com/WebReg/ActivityProfile.asp?D=13458&I=3459794

 

April is School Library Month!

If you’d like to find and print advocacy materials, check out the AASL advocacy website for School Library Month.

Historical information about the celebration: 

The AASL efforts for a national School Library Month were spearheaded by Lucille Thomas, chair of the School Library Media Month Committee. Thomas was appointed by President Judy King in 1983. AASL officials, local and national dignitaries got the month off to a rousing start on April 1, 1985 with a ceremony on the west steps of the U.S. Capitol. Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-N.Y.) delivered the keynote address. Moynihan told the school librarians in the audience, “I want to thank you for what you do. I hope you know how important your work is. You change lives for the better. You touch people while they can still be touched.”

In 2010, the name of the celebration was changed to School Library Month after the Board of Directors voted to readopt the professional title school librarian, from the former school library media specialist.

Kathleen Odean workshops canceled

We are sad to inform you that our 2-days of Kathleen Odean are canceled due to travel restrictions and the COVID-19 crisis. We are working out our options for bringing her back when the crisis is over.

In the meantime, stay safe and healthy.

Information about the Digies

We received updated information about the Digies Festival:

There have been many questions about the status of the Digies Digital Media Festival. Due to the current circumstances we have extended the deadline for submissions to Friday, May 1st. If further adjustments are required we will make them near that date.

The in-person festival, originally scheduled for May 21st, has been cancelled due to necessary constraints from the venue. We are continuing to look at options on how to celebrate the work of students.

In the meantime, keep those submissions coming!

 

Featured Resources: Images & The Smithsonian

There are a ton of images on the web, and if you need to use an image, you have to be very careful about where you get it. Pay attention to the licensing. If you’re not sure how to read the licensing, check out our LibGuide on Creative Commons. On the LibGuide, we explain the differences between copyright free and royalty-free. There is a link to the creative commons licensing explanations. We also include a list of sources for royalty-free photos.

In addition to these, you may have also heard, that the Smithsonian has released more than 2.8 million images that you can use for free. These will include 2D and 3D images. Find them here: https://www.si.edu/openaccess.

It is also worth checking out the Educator Resources on that same website. We will elaborate on this in future posts.