toatesl

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Advocacy

NYLA Library Advocacy Day is Tuesday, February 25th. On this day, library advocates from across New York State will converge on Albany to voice their support for funding and policies that benefit libraries.

In preparation, the Northern NY Library Network is hosting an informational webinar this Thursday, January 30th covering the basics of legislative visits in New York state.

Webinar:

Primer on Legislative Visits
Jan 30, 2020
1:00 PM Eastern Time
Register (free)

The presenter will be Jery Huntley, who worked as Chuck Schumer’s legislative director in the New York State Assembly beginning in 1978 and continued on his staff through his campaign for Congress, then became his legislative assistant for special projects in Washington, DC.

Ms. Huntley was also a teacher and school library media specialist in New York State. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in education (1971) and a Master of Library Science (1972) from SUNY Albany.

To get the basics on advocacy day, including information on security, hotels, and directions click here!

Jason Reynolds Resources

The big news in the library world last week was that author Jason Reynolds was named the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature for the years 2020-2021.  This means he’ll be traveling around the country visiting libraries, schools, and other places where young people congregate to inspire kids to read and tell their own stories through his platform, “GRAB THE MIC: Tell Your Story”. He will partner with StoryCorps to record interviews with students while on tour and create a true story archive of America’s children. These recordings will be housed in the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress.

Jason Reynolds  is the author of 13 books for young people including his most recent, “Look Both Ways: A Tale Told in Ten Blocks.” He is a Newbery and Prinz Honor recipient and a National Book Award finalist. He succeeds Jacqueline Woodson, and is the seventh National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature. The National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature is named by the Library of Congress, the Children’s Book council and Every Child a Reader.

Our Monroe One BOCES SLS Overdrive Account has the following titles. Click the picture to open it in SORA:

 

11th Annual Greater Rochester Teen Read – 2020

The 2020 Greater Rochester Teen Read featured author has been announced! 

The MCLS Young Adult Librarians are hosting the Eleventh Annual Greater Rochester Teen Read in 2020! They will be bringing Ruta Sepetys to Rochester to talk about her best-selling novel, Between Shades of Gray, and her latest novel, The Fountains of Silence.

Ruta Sepetys is an internationally acclaimed, #1 New York Times bestselling author of historical fiction published in over sixty countries and forty languages. Sepetys is considered a “crossover” novelist as her books are read by both students and adults worldwide. Winner of the Carnegie Medal, Ruta is renowned for giving voice to underrepresented history and those who experienced it. Her books have won or been shortlisted for over forty book prizes, are included on over thirty state reading lists, and are currently in development for film and television.

She will be available for school visits during the week of October 5-9, 2020. For information about bringing Ruta to your school, please contact Wendy Petry and mention that she will be here for the Greater Rochester Teen Read.

Previous GRTR authors have included Terry Trueman, Linda Sue Park, Vivian Vande Velde, A. S. King, Charles Benoit, Eoin Colfer, Jonathan Stroud, Jason Reynolds, Brendan Kiely, Paul Griffin, Laurie Halse Anderson, and Greg Neri. They presented their books at MCLS libraries, schools, and teen centers.

EMTA Media Literacy Project Grant

The 2020 Media Literacy Project Grant Application is open!

The New York State Educational Media/Technology Association provides up to two annual Media Literacy Grants in the amount of $1,250 for certified educators in New York State who are working with Pre-K-12 students on the subject of media literacy. Eligible educators must work in a district that participates in the media service at a BOCES or Big 5 that is an EMTA member.

Media Literacy is defined as the ability to comprehend, design, and produce media. It includes critical thinking skills used to evaluate and analyze information in a variety of formats. Media Literacy is essential to be able to distinguish between fact and fiction.

The purposes of the grant are to:

Support educators who provide resources and services that correlate to state and national learning standards for instructional excellence promoting media literacy.

To provide funds for research projects or demonstration projects that can be replicated in other areas across the state and nation.

Examples include:

  • A film literacy course held after school
  • Learning about the effective creation and use of media in student work
  • Using video effectively in your lesson plans

Please see the EMTA website for the application and more information.

Celebrate the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.

In the 1950s and ’60s, the civil rights movement brought sweeping reforms to nearly all facets of American life. With historical photographs and videos, Rosen Publishing’s Spotlight on the Civil Rights Movement records the 20th century’s most significant moments in the struggle for equality.

Monroe One BOCES School Library System has purchased all 13 books from this ROSEN ebook series and offers them for free to all of its school libraries.

Titles are:

  • Affirmative Action
  • Brown v. Board of Education
  • Freedom Riders
  • Lyndon B. Johnson and the Civil Rights Act
  • Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott
  • Sit-Ins and Nonviolent Protest for Racial Equality
  • The Black Power Movement and Civil Unrest
  • The Life and Death of Malcom X
  • The Life and Death of Martin Luther King Jr.
  • The Little Rock Desegregation Crisis
  • The March on Washington
  • The Murder of Emmett Till

Each ebook includes lesson plans, inquiry and project-based learning activities, primary sources – including historical documents and photos, biographies of key individuals, correlation to national and state standards, and an easy-to-use planning guide. These are incredible resources.

If you need the access information, please contact Liesl or Katie.

 

WXXI has also made some great resources available for grades 3-7 about Martin Luther King Jr, just in time to celebrate his national annual holiday. These include a five minute video aligned to History and Civics standards, and a Lesson Plan. These are available in Spanish and are housed on PBS Learning Media, which is free for New York Educators.

Take advantage of these valuable resources today!

Social Media for your School Library

A few years ago I was able to attend the ISTE National Conference in Philadelphia. One thing I found impressive was that they included Twitter Handles on the name badges. National Conferences are largely valuable for the networking opportunities they provide. What a great way for educators to continue that networking and expand their current professional learning community!

It got me thinking about the librarians in our region, and how many of them have a Facebook page or Twitter handle for their school libraries. Educators are sometimes skeptical when it comes to social media, and I get it. You don’t really want your students to see what you get up to on the weekends. However, having a social media account is a really great idea for your school library, and yes, that even means elementary schools.

What better way to showcase the great programming happening in your library? Need more students to join library club? Tweet about it! If you have older students, you can use this as a platform for teaching them responsible ways to use social media. By having students help you create your library “brand”, they will understand how social media can affect their own digital identities.

In her Scholastic Edublog article, Tamiko Brown (2017 School Librarian of the Year by SLJ and Scholastic) lays out 5 Reasons School Librarians Should Use Social Media.

Laura Fleming for Edutopia writes about The Power of a School Library Hashtag.

This website from the New Zealand National Library, Social media and the school library, explains how social media can help you find new ways to support reading, inquiry and digital literacy. It will also show your school community that you welcome student involvement. This last link is a great resource because it includes guidelines and strategies for social media use, as well as a guide to different platforms, and examples of school libraries that use social media.

See you @M1Bsls

 

SLJ Middle Grade Magic Free Virtual Event

Complimentary Registration is now open for School Library Journal’s FREE Virtual Event: Middle Grade Magic.

This is a day-long celebration and exploration of one of the burgeoning and most important areas of publishing for young readers: literature for children ages eight through 12 – and beyond! Attendees will get a behind-the-scenes glimpse at some of the most anticipated new titles, hear from celebrated authors, and – for the first time this year – attend librarian-led sessions on services and programming for middle graders. Attendees will also have the opportunity to check out the virtual exhibit hall, chat directly with authors, download educational resources, and receive prizes and giveaways.

Middle Grade Magic is a free, completely virtual conference – no traveling, no cost. Attendees will also earn CE credits for all the webcast sessions they attend.

Click the image above to get to the registration page!

From Books… to Build! Using books to kickoff maker projects

Looking for ways to tie maker projects into your library? Start with a book! Join us for our upcoming session:

From Books to Build: Using books to kickoff maker projects

February 5th – 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm at Monroe One BOCES

Intended for Librarians who want to jumpstart their maker projects with a literary connection. In this hour, we’ll booktalk some great books and get our hands-on a few maker projects in the process. If you have a book and project to share, please bring it along!

This is intended for School Librarians.

Register here: https://www.mylearningplan.com/WebReg/ActivityProfile.asp?D=13458&I=3359804

 

Featured Videos: Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is coming up on January 20th. We have some great resources for you!

There are a number of great videos for all grade levels in Safari MONTAGE. Click on the titles to view the videos in Safari MONTAGE. (Some videos are embedded below and viewable if you are signed into our Safari MONTAGE account already.)

Martin Luther King, Jr. Song (Grades K-4)

This video from NUMBEROCK presents a song about the life of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. This video is hosted on YouTube and offered through Safari MONTAGE.

Martin Luther King, Jr: Our top 5 fun facts (Grades 3-8)

This video from Educational Videos for Students presents a brief biography of civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Jr. and five facts about him that you may have never heard before. This video is hosted on YouTube and offered through Safari MONTAGE.

History Kids: From Selma to Montgomery-Marching with Martin Luther King Jr. (Grades 5-8)

By watching this program, students will discover what led to the civil rights protests in Selma, Alabama, in 1965. What were the events of Bloody Sunday? What did Martin Luther King Jr. do in its aftermath? How did the official march from Selma to Montgomery on March 21, 1965, unfold? What were the effects of this march? The answers to all of this are covered in depth with detailed graphics, diagrams, and historic video. On-screen multiple-choice reviews at the end of each segment reinforce important concepts. This video is offered through our Learn360 service.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Dream (Grades 9-12)

The video, embedded below and linked in the title, opens with a clip from his most famous “I Have a Dream” speech, and moves into the nation’s reaction and the aftermath of his death. It is a thorough examination of Dr. King’s legacy. This video is offered through our Learn360 service.

King in the Wilderness (Grades 9 – Adult)

From award-winning director/producer Peter Kunhardt, King in the Wilderness follows Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during the volatile last three years of his life, from the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965 to his assassination in April 1968. Drawing on revelatory stories from his inner circle of friends, the film provides a clear window into the civil rights leader’s character, showing him to be a man with an unshakeable commitment to peaceful protest in the face of an increasingly unstable country. Illuminating and poignant, the documentary – which is tied to the 50th anniversary of King’s death – reveals a conflicted leader whose successes were punctuated in his final years by an onslaught of criticism from both sides of the political spectrum, whether the Black Power movement, who saw his nonviolence as weakness, or President Lyndon B. Johnson, who viewed his anti-Vietnam War speeches as irresponsible. With compassion and clarity, King in the Wilderness unearths a stirring new perspective into Dr. King’s character, his radical doctrine of nonviolence, and his internal philosophical struggles prior to his death, inviting a sense of penetrating intimacy and insight into one of the most profound thinkers of our time.

This is An HBO Production offered through our Learn360 service.

Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise: Out of the Shadows (Grades 9 – Adult)

In ”Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise,” Henry Louis Gates, Jr. embarks on a deeply personal journey through the last 50 years of African-American history. The first episode of the series begins at a turning point in American history: the Selma marches and Watts riots, which marked a new phase in the African-American struggle. Gates explores the rising call for Black Power, which redefined American culture, politics and society. This program contains strong language. This is a PBS production available through Safari MONTAGE.

 

Podcast: “Representation and Critical Thinking in Media”

In 1988, the father of Michelle Ciulla Lipkin, was killed in the Pan Am 103 bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland. As a 17-year old girl in 1988, the only information she could get about her father’s death was from the news media. It wasn’t until 3 years had passed, when she went to Scotland and met the people who found her father’s body, that she hadn’t realized there was more to the story than what the media had told her.

Fast forward 31 years, and Michelle is the Executive Director of the National Association of Media Literacy Education (NAMLE), working to advance Media Literacy Education.

Recently Michelle told her personal story on the podcast The Woodshed (created and run by advertising agency Crispin, Porter, and Bogusky). Michelle explains, through the events of her past, how she learned to critically think about the information she was being fed by the media. In this story, we learn why Media Literacy Education is so important to her, and the ensuing conversation explains why it should be important to everyone.

Give it a listen: thewoodshedshow.com

**Please note, there are swear words in the theme song.