All Posts

160 posts

PBS NEWSHOUR Daily News Story

You should already know that PBS and WXXI have curated FREE, standards-aligned videos, interactives, lesson plans, and more for teachers to use with their classes. All of these are housed at www.pbslearningmedia.org.

Now, thanks to PBS NewsHour, you can explore lesson plans to tie current events into every subject with the PBS NewsHour Daily News Story.

Directed at grade levels 6-12, the media in this collection is gathered to educate students about the latest top news stories, and designed to make them think about how they may be impacted by what is going on in the wider world. The latest in the collection includes lessons on Greta Thunberg and Climate Change, Gun Rights and Gun Massacres in America, the College Admissions Scandal, the Mueller Report, and more.

Down the left side of the page, you will find a filter list so you can narrow your topic.

 

Three Apples Bookmarks

The Three Apples Book Awards were developed to encourage the joy of reading for pleasure, and to give the children and teens in New York State the opportunity to participate in honoring their favorite books. These awards, in the three categories for Young Readers, Children, and Teens, are sponsored by the School Library Media Section of the New York State Library Association, which represents the school libraries of the state.

The Three Apples Committee just released their three bookmarks (pictured below). Click on each one to open a printable copy.

Students have until April to read the titles, and voting takes place in April.

Any questions? Contact Liesl for who to contact. She doesn’t want to post that person’s email address here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about 3 Apples, and other book awards, check out our LibGuide!

PBS Virtual Professional Learning Series

PBS Kids is offering a FREE virtual professional learning series on media literacy. The first session takes place tonight!

Part 1: Media Mentorship in the Classroom – November 19th at 7:00 pm

It’s the classic debate: is there a place for media in any learning environment? If so, what is our role in helping children–even the littlest learners–understand and use it? In this interactive discussion, the first of three ‘live learning’ sessions, we’ll consider your role as a Media Mentor. We’ll cover all the hot topics including: screen time, digital citizenship, and technology availability.

Register Now

Part 2: Using Media to Bring Stories to Life – December 3rd at 7:00 pm

Everyone loves a good story–especially our littlest learners! In this session, we’ll share ideas and best practices you can use to inspire creative, young storytellers. This includes a deep dive into different types of media – from e-books to augmented reality – and a look at real-world success stories from inside and outside of the classroom.

Register Now

Part 3: Using Media to Lift the Littlest Voices – December 10th at 7:00 pm

Have you ever noticed that our Littles have A LOT to say? Whether they’ve mastered language or not, they are brimming with ideas, imagination and creativity. This episode focuses on how you can help nurture those strengths and encourage learners to create their own content.

Take a deep dive into understanding the important role media creation plays in each episode and explore how educators are using the show to engage their little learners in the content creation process.

Register Now

For more Professional Development Opportunities, check our Calendar of Events.

Sphero

Monroe One is teaming up with Monroe 2 to offer this exciting workshop!

Coding with Sphero

 

December 10, 2019 – 3:30 – 5pm at Monroe One BOCES
Teaming up with Lindsay Neumire from Monroe 2-Orleans BOCES, this workshop is open to librarians of both regions. Sphero is a little round robot that’s not only fun to play with, but can be used effectively to teach coding concepts, math, and more! In this 1.5 hour hands-on workshop, attendees will learn to control Sphero, code with Sphero, and practice and discuss ways to use it to strengthen curricular concepts. This workshop is for School Librarians. Teachers may attend if they attend with their School Librarian with the intent to collaborate in the future.

Monroe One has a classroom set of Spheros for you to try out in your library available after the workshop.

Register here: https://www.mylearningplan.com/WebReg/ActivityProfile.asp?D=13458&I=3256770

For more Professional Development Opportunities, check our Calendar of Events.

Free Speech: Challenge of Our Times

This first paragraph (in quotes) is taken VERBATIM from the WXXI Television Highlights —

“Free speech is a fundamental element to a democracy. In America, it’s sometimes taken for granted. Free Speech: Challenge of Our Times, presented by Arizona State University’s School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership and Arizona PBS, takes a deep look into this constitutional right and how we as Americans can protect it. The programs pull a diverse spectrum of viewpoints from academics, politicians and free speech thought leaders.”

These ten programs are online for your students to watch at any time. While some may seem a little dry, they bring up important points for our students to think about. These programs would be especially valuable to social studies classes, journalism students, and libraries – champions of intellectual freedom!

Program 1 features former US Senators Tom Daschle, D-S.D. and Jon Kyl, R-Arizona, as they discuss disagreement and the role of civil dialogue in American politics and culture. (27m 40s)

Program 2 highlights First Amendment lawyer and author Floyd Abrams, who represented The New York Times in the landmark Pentagon Papers Supreme Court case, where he explains why free speech must be protected.

Program 3 features Jonathan Haidt, author of “The Righteous Mind” and co-founder of Heterodox Academy, explores “America’s Escalating Outrage” and its impact of universities in America.

Program 4– Scholars Robert P. George and Cornel West discuss the importance of open dialogue in pursuit of civil discussion and the serious and respectful exchange of ideas, on university campuses and in American society.

Program 5 features Middlebury Professor Allison Stanger and Reed Professor Lucia Martinez Valdivia as they examine issues that surround free speech on campus when protests turn extreme.

Program 6 is a student panel discussion about ‘Why Do Students Need Free Speech on Campus?’ It is part of the “Free Speech and Intellectual Diversity in Higher Education and American Society” series sponsored by SCETL and co-sponsored by the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and the Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law at ASU.

Program 7 – Bret Weinstein, evolutionary biologist; Heather MacDonald, the Thomas W. Smith fellow at the Manhattan Institute; and Ulrich Baer, professor of German and Comparative Literature at New York University; talk about negotiating controversial speakers on campus.

Program 8 Professor Geoffrey Stone of the University of Chicago, who authored the school’s statement of principles on free expression, discusses the appropriate limits on free speech in institutions of higher learning.

Program 9 Experimental psychologist and Harvard University Professor Steven Pinker explores the fundamental right of free speech.

Program 10 Steven Hayward of Powerline and University of California, Berkeley, presents the intellectual suicide of American universities and the causes and remedies associated with it.

NPR Student Podcast Challenge


Last spring, NPR’s education team held a student podcast challenge. 55,000 students entered, of which, they announced two winners. Well, they’re bringing the contest back!

NPR is launching the 2nd annual student podcast challenge.

Students are invited to create a podcast – with the help of a teacher – and enter for a chance to win a grand prize and have their work showcased on NPR’s Morning Edition or All Things Considered. The contest is for students between grades 5 and 12. Each podcast should be between 3 and 12 minutes long, and it can be about ANYTHING.

For complete information on the contest, how it works, the rules, FAQ’s, and submission info see: https://www.npr.org/2018/11/15/650500116/npr-student-podcast-challenge-home

Listen to last year’s winners:

Murderous Mary & The RISE Of Erwin by four high school students in Elizabethton, TN

Marshmallow – by 8th grade Bronx Prep Middle School students

After you’ve entered your podcast into the NPR Student Podcast Challenge, enter it into the Digies as well.

Macmillan ebooks Embargo

As I’m sure you’ve heard, Macmillan Publishing has already begun its embargo against library ebooks as of November 1st. If you haven’t heard, let’s catch you up: Read/listen to this NPR story by Lynn Neary.

In a nutshell, Macmillan Publishers is restricting libraries from purchasing more than one copy of an ebook during the first 8-weeks of publishing. Libraries are allowed to purchase one perpetual-use copy at the regular retail price (normally libraries pay much more for an ebook). After the 8-week embargo, they are allowed to purchase more copies at the regular library cost. This has caused a wave of criticism from libraries across the nation and from ALA, whose central mission is: equitable access for all.

Mark Smith, the Texas State Librarian, provided a really great overview in his blog post from Monday, November 4th after meeting with Macmillan CEO, John Sargent. He explains Mr. Sargent’s thinking about the situation, but ties up his post by showing how if there are no repercussions for Macmillan implementing this model, other ebook vendors might adopt the same policies. This type of purchasing model from ebook vendors has the potential to disrupt library ebook lending for all libraries. This includes school libraries.

As school librarians in 2019, we have enough trouble getting students to become lifelong readers. Making them wait 8 weeks longer for the book they want is not going to help us.

There is a petition circulating around social media library groups that is housed on www.ebooksforall.org. If you sign it, you’ll receive an email from the ALA stating “We ask you to share your experiences with the embargo now that it is in effect. Screenshot your waitlist and share your story on the #eBooksForAll hashtag about how the embargo is impacting your community.

You play a vital role in ALA’s advocacy work. If you haven’t already signed up as an advocate, please do so here: http://bit.ly/ALAadvocate2019. And be sure to follow ALA on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram to stay up-to-date on all of our ongoing efforts and, in particular, the progress of this campaign.” We urge you to be an advocate for library ebooks.

Frontline Films Online

Do you ever happen to see something on FRONTLINE that would work perfectly with your students?

FRONTLINE films are investigative, journalistic documentaries that often air on PBS. These films cover current events, and uncover stories that are often untold. They’ve won 91 Emmy awards and 22 Peabody awards. They have also posted over 200 of their films online for you to watch FOR FREE whenever you want.

Find them at: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/

A few of their listed titles are:

  • Fire in Paradise
  • In the Age of AI
  • Flint’s Deadly Water
  • Documenting Hate: Charlottesville
  • Documenting Hate: New American Nazis
  • The Trouble with Chicken

… And So Much More!!!

Veterans Day

Veterans Day is coming up on Monday. Originally called, Armistice Day, it commemorated the end of the fighting of World War I, when the Allies and Germany put an armistice into effect on the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month”. It was a day to honor veterans of World War I. However, World War II happened, and then the Korean War after that. In 1954, it was renamed Veterans Day to honor American veterans of all wars.

Since World War I was an international conflict, this is a day that our allies also celebrate. Britain, Canada, and Australia all celebrate “Remembrance Day” on or around November 11.

Lange, Katie. “5 Facts to Know About Veterans Day.” U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, 5 Nov. 2018,
www.defense.gov/explore/story/article/1675470/5-facts-to-know-about-veterans-day/.

We have lots of resources for you and your students about Veterans Day.

Videos:

 

Armistice Day and Veteran’s Day

Woodrow Wilson declared November 11th Armistice Day to honor the veterans of World War I. Later Dwight D Eisenhower changed the name to Veteran’s Day to honor all veterans.

 

 

What is Veterans Day?

A time machine accidentally takes most of the Sharp Wits back in time to 1918 to help them understand what Veterans Day is. They learn the Veterans Day began as Armistice Day, November 11, 1918, the day that World War I ended.

 

There are many more videos available in Safari Montage and Learn360 on this topic.

Ebooks:

 

 

2020 School Librarian of the Year

The search is on for the 2020 School Librarian of the Year!

This award honors a K-12 library professional for outstanding achievement in school library services. To be considered, applicants must be certified school librarians – as recognized by the state of NY – and be working in a public or private school. (Directors, supervisors and managers of library programs are not eligible).

Winners will receive a cash award of $2,500, plus $2,500 in-kind digital or print products for their library. The winner will also receive a bunch of books from John Schumacher, Ambassador of School Libraries, Scholastic. Travel to participate in a 2020 Scholastic Book Fairs Summer Reading Summit (airfare, one night hotel stay and registration) is also included.

Winners will be judged based on their service to fulfill the needs of students and the community, creativity in programming, integration of library services within the curricula, technology integration and other criteria.

Nominations close on December 2nd. Winners will be announced in March.

For more information on how to apply go to www.slj.com.