Daily Archives: October 25, 2019

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Native Waters: A Chitimacha Recollection

The Chitimacha, the 1,000-member tribe known as “the People of Many Waters,” are heirs to an unbroken 8,000-year past. Living off the bounty of Louisiana’s Atchafalaya Basin, one of the richest inland estuaries on the continent, this indigenous nation persists and rejuvenates its culture despite gradually losing its ancestral territory to environmental and man-made forces. NATIVE WATERS: A CHITIMACHA RECOLLECTION journeys into sacred places of the Atchafalaya Basin with author Roger Stouff, the son of the last chief of the Chitimacha Indians and a keeper of his family’s oral tradition.  Stouff shares native stories, beliefs and perspectives about this often overlooked people. An avid fly-fisherman, Stouff laments the certain demise of the river basin, the depletion of its sacred fishing and hunting grounds and the painful “vanishings” of the time-honored Chitimacha way of life.  Airs 10/30 at 1:30 a.m.

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Koo-Hoot Kiwat: The Caddo Grass House

A Caddo tribal elder and his apprentice return to their ancestral homeland in East Texas to direct the construction of a traditional grass house.  Airs 10/30 at 1 a.m.

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Water from the Wilderness: Hetch Hetchy to San Francisco Bay

Water from the Wilderness: Hetch Hetchy to San Francisco Bay traces the extraordinary history of San Francisco’s water system as well as the engineering and delivery of an urban water system in the era of climate change. Situated on a mostly arid coastal peninsula, the population boom that came with the California Gold Rush underscored San Francisco’s need to develop a source of fresh water for the growing city. The 1906 earthquake finally spurred city fathers to create a public water utility. When the city chose a site in the pristine Hetch Hetchy valley, inside Yosemite National Park, an epic battle was led by John Muir. Today, with the impact of climate change keenly felt, the politics of water remain front page news. “Water from the Wilderness” explores the ways an urban water utility, and those who depend on it, are learning to adapt and plan for an uncertain future. Airs 10/29 at 3 a.m.

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Water from the Wilderness: Hetch Hetchy to San Francisco Bay

 

Sit and Be Fit LIVE in Central Park

From the producers of the award-winning health and fitness TV series comes new Sit and Be Fit exercise programming, SIT AND BE FIT LIVE IN CENTRAL PARK! These two fun half-hour programs were taped on location at the iconic “Tavern on the Green” terrace in Manhattan’s Central Park and feature host Mary Ann Wilson, RN, with a diverse group of New York City residents exercising outdoors. Wilson’s gentle warmth as a host lends charm to the exercise programs which feature fun rehabilitative movements set to lively music. Exercising on location with NYC fans was part of Central Park’s “Fitness Friday” events aimed at promoting active lifestyles. Wilson is joined on set by her daughter, Gretchen, who demonstrates seated versions of the standing exercises.  Airs 10/24 at 4 a.m.

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Ohiyesa Soul of an Indian

This documentary follows Kate Beane, a young Dakota woman, as she examines the extraordinary life of her celebrated relative, Charles Eastman (Ohiyesa). Biography and journey come together as Kate traces Eastman’s path-from traditional Dakota boyhood, through education at Dartmouth College, and in later roles as physician, author, lecturer and Native American advocate.  Airs 10/23 at 1 a.m.

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Twisted Tales of Poe:  Theatre of the Mind #10

The Tell-Tale Heart, The Cask of Amontildo and The Raven – The one-hour program presents three of Edgar Allan Poe’s tales: “The Tell-Tale Heart,” “The Cask of Amontillado,” and “The Raven.”  Airs 10/31 at 10:30 p.m.

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Media Literacy Week! (Day 5)

Friday, October 25th


This week is U.S. Media Literacy Week! The mission of the week is to highlight the power of media literacy education and its essential role in education all across the country.


This wraps up our week-long celebration of Media Literacy Education. We hope you’ve learned about Media Literacy, gained an understanding of how important it is for our students, and found some new activities or resources that are useful to you.

We encourage all of you to keep the momentum going. Media Literacy Education should be reinforced year round.

Use our Media Literacy LibGuide to help you find information for your teachers on a regular basis. This guide links out to information from:

This LibGuide will be updated periodically to add new resources as we find them.

Some excellent books to help you continue your learning are available in our Overdrive/SORA account:

 

 

 

 

(Ctrl-click the picture to open SORA. Select your school, and then log-in using your regular school credentials – as if you are logging into your school computer). Please take this Post-Assessment, and give it to your students to see if their thinking has changed over the course of this week. (Results will be sent out to our librarians next week. If you are not in our region, please contact Liesl.)

Lastly, if you feel strongly about this topic and its importance in schools, Media Literacy Now has put together this call to action. Click the image below to get to the website.

 

 

 

Please share this with those who are willing and able to support this federal legislation.

 

Thank you for participating in Media Literacy Week!